0 信鼎平台网站-APP安装下载

信鼎平台网站 注册最新版下载

信鼎平台网站 注册

信鼎平台网站注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:汤姆-麦克唐纳 大小:GaeV3qbG27249KB 下载:hz2wYPad34593次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:gwU3iXNs54905条
日期:2020-08-05 15:33:44
安卓
穆矢

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  When the hounds saw Ulysses they set up a furious barking and flewat him, but Ulysses was cunning enough to sit down and loose hishold of the stick that he had in his hand: still, he would have beentorn by them in his own homestead had not the swineherd dropped his oxhide, rushed full speed through the gate of the yard and driven thedogs off by shouting and throwing stones at them. Then he said toUlysses, "Old man, the dogs were likely to have made short work ofyou, and then you would have got me into trouble. The gods havegiven me quite enough worries without that, for I have lost the bestof masters, and am in continual grief on his account. I have to attendswine for other people to eat, while he, if he yet lives to see thelight of day, is starving in some distant land. But come inside, andwhen you have had your fill of bread and wine, tell me where youcome from, and all about your misfortunes."
2.  "Do not," replied Vulcan, "ask me to do this; a bad man's bond isbad security; what remedy could I enforce against you if Mars shouldgo away and leave his debts behind him along with his chains?"
3.  Telemachus approved of what his father had said, so he callednurse Euryclea and said, "Nurse, shut the women up in their room,while I take the armour that my father left behind him down into thestore room. No one looks after it now my father is gone, and it hasgot all smirched with soot during my own boyhood. I want to take itdown where the smoke cannot reach it."
4.  To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."
5.  As he spoke he sprang from his seat, threw his crimson cloak fromhim, and took his sword from his shoulder. First he set the axes ina row, in a long groove which he had dug for them, and had Wadestraight by line. Then he stamped the earth tight round them, andeveryone was surprised when they saw him set up so orderly, thoughhe had never seen anything of the kind before. This done, he went onto the pavement to make trial of the bow; thrice did he tug at it,trying with all his might to draw the string, and thrice he had toleave off, though he had hoped to string the bow and shoot through theiron. He was trying for the fourth time, and would have strung ithad not Ulysses made a sign to check him in spite of all hiseagerness. So he said:
6.  "Phemius," she cried, "you know many another feat of gods andheroes, such as poets love to celebrate. Sing the suitors some oneof these, and let them drink their wine in silence, but cease this sadtale, for it breaks my sorrowful heart, and reminds me of my losthusband whom I mourn ever without ceasing, and whose name was greatover all Hellas and middle Argos."

计划指导

1.  BOOK XXIV.
2.  With this Telemachus dashed his staff to the ground and burst intotears. Every one was very sorry for him, but they all sat still and noone ventured to make him an angry answer, save only Antinous, whospoke thus:
3.  "My father is dead and gone," answered Telemachus, "and even if somerumour reaches me I put no more faith in it now. My mother does indeedsometimes send for a soothsayer and question him, but I give hisprophecyings no heed. As for the stranger, he was Mentes, son ofAnchialus, chief of the Taphians, an old friend of my father's." Butin his heart he knew that it had been the goddess.
4.  This was how they talked, but they knew nothing about it; andAlcinous said, "I remember now the old prophecy of my father. Hesaid that Neptune would be angry with us for taking every one sosafely over the sea, and would one day wreck a Phaeacian ship as itwas returning from an escort, and bury our city under a high mountain.This was what my old father used to say, and now it is all comingtrue. Now therefore let us all do as I say; in the first place we mustleave off giving people escorts when they come here, and in the nextlet us sacrifice twelve picked bulls to Neptune that he may have mercyupon us, and not bury our city under the high mountain." When thepeople heard this they were afraid and got ready the bulls.
5.  "'Can you show me,' said I, 'some stratagem by means of which Imay catch this old god without his suspecting it and finding me out?For a god is not easily caught- not by a mortal man.'
6.  "My dear child," answered Euryclea, "I am not mocking you. It isquite true as I tell you that Ulysses is come home again. He was thestranger whom they all kept on treating so badly in the cloister.Telemachus knew all the time that he was come back, but kept hisfather's secret that he might have his revenge on all these wickedpeople.

推荐功能

1.  "Telemachus, I shall go upstairs and lie down on that sad couch,which I have not ceased to water with my tears, from the day Ulyssesset out for Troy with the sons of Atreus. You failed, however, to makeit clear to me before the suitors came back to the house, whether orno you had been able to hear anything about the return of yourfather."
2.  When she heard the sure proofs Ulysses now gave her, she fairlybroke down. She flew weeping to his side, flung her arms about hisneck, and kissed him. "Do not be angry with me Ulysses," she cried,"you, who are the wisest of mankind. We have suffered, both of us.Heaven has denied us the happiness of spending our youth, and ofgrowing old, together; do not then be aggrieved or take it amissthat I did not embrace you thus as soon as I saw you. I have beenshuddering all the time through fear that someone might come hereand deceive me with a lying story; for there are many very wickedpeople going about. Jove's daughter Helen would never have yieldedherself to a man from a foreign country, if she had known that thesons of Achaeans would come after her and bring her back. Heaven putit in her heart to do wrong, and she gave no thought to that sin,which has been the source of all our sorrows. Now, however, that youhave convinced me by showing that you know all about our bed (which nohuman being has ever seen but you and I and a single maid servant, thedaughter of Actor, who was given me by my father on my marriage, andwho keeps the doors of our room) hard of belief though I have been Ican mistrust no longer."
3.  "Then Jove let fly with his thunderbolts, and the ship went roundand round, and was filled with fire and brimstone as the lightningstruck it. The men all fell into the sea; they were carried about inthe water round the ship, looking like so many sea-gulls, but thegod presently deprived them of all chance of getting home again.
4.  "By this time my deep sleep had left me, and I turned back to theship and to the sea shore. As I drew near I began to smell hot roastmeat, so I groaned out a prayer to the immortal gods. 'Father Jove,' Iexclaimed, 'and all you other gods who live in everlasting bliss,you have done me a cruel mischief by the sleep into which you havesent me; see what fine work these men of mine have been making in myabsence.'
5.   "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."
6.  "Good heavens, this voyage of Telemachus is a very serious matter;we had made sure that it would come to nothing, but the young fellowhas got away in spite of us, and with a picked crew too. He will begiving us trouble presently; may Jove take him before he is fullgrown. Find me a ship, therefore, with a crew of twenty men, and Iwill lie in wait for him in the straits between Ithaca and Samos; hewill then rue the day that he set out to try and get news of hisfather."

应用

1.  "Here Perimedes and Eurylochus held the victims, while I drew mysword and dug the trench a cubit each way. I made a drink-offeringto all the dead, first with honey and milk, then with wine, andthirdly with water, and I sprinkled white barley meal over thewhole, praying earnestly to the poor feckless ghosts, and promisingthem that when I got back to Ithaca I would sacrifice a barrenheifer for them, the best I had, and would load the pyre with goodthings. I also particularly promised that Teiresias should have ablack sheep to himself, the best in all my flocks. When I had prayedsufficiently to the dead, I cut the throats of the two sheep and letthe blood run into the trench, whereon the ghosts came trooping upfrom Erebus- brides, young bachelors, old men worn out with toil,maids who had been crossed in love, and brave men who had beenkilled in battle, with their armour still smirched with blood; theycame from every quarter and flitted round the trench with a strangekind of screaming sound that made me turn pale with fear. When I sawthem coming I told the men to be quick and flay the carcasses of thetwo dead sheep and make burnt offerings of them, and at the sametime to repeat prayers to Hades and to Proserpine; but I sat where Iwas with my sword drawn and would not let the poor feckless ghostscome near the blood till Teiresias should have answered my questions.
2.  Thus did he speak. His hearers all of them approved his saying andagreed that he should have his escort inasmuch as he had spokenreasonably. Alcinous therefore said to his servant, "Pontonous, mixsome wine and hand it round to everybody, that we may offer a prayerto father Jove, and speed our guest upon his way."
3.  'Son-in-law and daughter," replied Autolycus, "call the childthus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in oneplace and another, both men and women; so name the child 'Ulysses,' orthe child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother'sfamily on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him apresent and will send him on his way rejoicing."
4、  "Do not wake her yet," answered Ulysses, "but tell the women whohave misconducted themselves to come to me."
5、  "She came to me one day when I was by myself, as I often was, forthe men used to go with their barbed hooks, all over the island in thehope of catching a fish or two to save them from the pangs ofhunger. 'Stranger,' said she, 'it seems to me that you like starvingin this way- at any rate it does not greatly trouble you, for youstick here day after day, without even trying to get away thoughyour men are dying by inches.'

旧版特色

!

网友评论(uMe9WqQk47050))

  • 迈克尔·莫菲 08-04

      And in like manner Eumaeus prayed that Ulysses might return home.

  • 沈国军 08-04

      When she heard the sure proofs Ulysses now gave her, she fairlybroke down. She flew weeping to his side, flung her arms about hisneck, and kissed him. "Do not be angry with me Ulysses," she cried,"you, who are the wisest of mankind. We have suffered, both of us.Heaven has denied us the happiness of spending our youth, and ofgrowing old, together; do not then be aggrieved or take it amissthat I did not embrace you thus as soon as I saw you. I have beenshuddering all the time through fear that someone might come hereand deceive me with a lying story; for there are many very wickedpeople going about. Jove's daughter Helen would never have yieldedherself to a man from a foreign country, if she had known that thesons of Achaeans would come after her and bring her back. Heaven putit in her heart to do wrong, and she gave no thought to that sin,which has been the source of all our sorrows. Now, however, that youhave convinced me by showing that you know all about our bed (which nohuman being has ever seen but you and I and a single maid servant, thedaughter of Actor, who was given me by my father on my marriage, andwho keeps the doors of our room) hard of belief though I have been Ican mistrust no longer."

  • 刘建伟 08-04

       As she spoke Minerva touched him with her wand and covered himwith wrinkles, took away all his yellow hair, and withered the fleshover his whole body; she bleared his eyes, which were naturally veryfine ones; she changed his clothes and threw an old rag of a wrapabout him, and a tunic, tattered, filthy, and begrimed with smoke; shealso gave him an undressed deer skin as an outer garment, andfurnished him with a staff and a wallet all in holes, with a twistedthong for him to sling it over his shoulder.

  • 赵长青 08-04

      "When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I took thethree men on whose prowess of all kinds I could most rely, and wentalong by the sea-side, praying heartily to heaven. Meanwhile thegoddess fetched me up four seal skins from the bottom of the sea,all of them just skinned, for she meant playing a trick upon herfather. Then she dug four pits for us to lie in, and sat down towait till we should come up. When we were close to her, she made uslie down in the pits one after the other, and threw a seal skin overeach of us. Our ambuscade would have been intolerable, for thestench of the fishy seals was most distressing- who would go to bedwith a sea monster if he could help it?-but here, too, the goddesshelped us, and thought of something that gave us great relief, for sheput some ambrosia under each man's nostrils, which was so fragrantthat it killed the smell of the seals.

  • 郑伟哉 08-03

    {  Then Eumaeus said, "You have perceived aright, as indeed yougenerally do; but let us think what will be our best course. Willyou go inside first and join the suitors, leaving me here behindyou, or will you wait here and let me go in first? But do not waitlong, or some one may you loitering about outside, and throw somethingat you. Consider this matter I pray you."

  • 程凡病 08-02

      So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had gotsafely home except Ulysses, and he, though he was longing to return tohis wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had gothim into a large cave and wanted to marry him. But as years went by,there came a time when the gods settled that he should go back toIthaca; even then, however, when he was among his own people, histroubles were not yet over; nevertheless all the gods had now begun topity him except Neptune, who still persecuted him without ceasingand would not let him get home.}

  • 强木根 08-02

      "'I have heard nothing,' I answered, 'of Peleus, but I can tellyou all about your son Neoptolemus, for I took him in my own ship fromScyros with the Achaeans. In our councils of war before Troy he wasalways first to speak, and his judgement was unerring. Nestor and Iwere the only two who could surpass him; and when it came tofighting on the plain of Troy, he would never remain with the bodyof his men, but would dash on far in front, foremost of them all invalour. Many a man did he kill in battle- I cannot name every singleone of those whom he slew while fighting on the side of the Argives,but will only say how he killed that valiant hero Eurypylus son ofTelephus, who was the handsomest man I ever saw except Memnon; manyothers also of the Ceteians fell around him by reason of a woman'sbribes. Moreover, when all the bravest of the Argives went insidethe horse that Epeus had made, and it was left to me to settle when weshould either open the door of our ambuscade, or close it, thoughall the other leaders and chief men among the Danaans were dryingtheir eyes and quaking in every limb, I never once saw him turn palenor wipe a tear from his cheek; he was all the time urging me to breakout from the horse- grasping the handle of his sword and hisbronze-shod spear, and breathing fury against the foe. Yet when we hadsacked the city of Priam he got his handsome share of the prizemoney and went on board (such is the fortune of war) without a woundupon him, neither from a thrown spear nor in close combat, for therage of Mars is a matter of great chance.'

  • 喻树迅 08-02

      Then Antinous said, "Queen Penelope, daughter of Icarius, take asmany presents as you please from any one who will give them to you; itis not well to refuse a present; but we will not go about our businessnor stir from where we are, till you have married the best man amongus whoever he may be."

  • 文格 08-01

       And Ulysses answered, "I understand and heed. Go in first andleave me here where I am. I am quite used to being beaten and havingthings thrown at me. I have been so much buffeted about in war andby sea that I am case-hardened, and this too may go with the rest. Buta man cannot hide away the cravings of a hungry belly; this is anenemy which gives much trouble to all men; it is because of thisthat ships are fitted out to sail the seas, and to make war upon otherpeople."

  • 万君 07-30

    {  "I will tell you then truth," replied her son. "We went to Pylos andsaw Nestor, who took me to his house and treated me as hospitably asthough I were a son of his own who had just returned after a longabsence; so also did his sons; but he said he had not heard a wordfrom any human being about Ulysses, whether he was alive or dead. Hesent me, therefore, with a chariot and horses to Menelaus. There I sawHelen, for whose sake so many, both Argives and Trojans, were inheaven's wisdom doomed to suffer. Menelaus asked me what it was thathad brought me to Lacedaemon, and I told him the whole truth,whereon he said, 'So, then, these cowards would usurp a brave man'sbed? A hind might as well lay her new-born young in the lair of alion, and then go off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell.The lion, when he comes back to his lair, will make short work withthe pair of them, and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By fatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he waswhen he wrestled with Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him soheavily that all the Greeks cheered him- if he is still such, and wereto come near these suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorrywedding. As regards your question, however, I will not prevaricate nordeceive you, but what the old man of the sea told me, so much will Itell you in full. He said he could see Ulysses on an islandsorrowing bitterly in the house of the nymph Calypso, who waskeeping him prisoner, and he could not reach his home, for he had noships nor sailors to take him over the sea.' This was what Menelaustold me, and when I had heard his story I came away; the gods thengave me a fair wind and soon brought me safe home again."

  • 玉兰亭 07-30

      Then Penelope answered, "Stranger, heaven robbed me of all beauty,whether of face or figure, when the Argives set sail for Troy and mydear husband with them. If he were to return and look after my affairsI should be both more respected and should show a better presence tothe world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. The chiefs fromall our islands- Dulichium, Same, and Zacynthus, as also from Ithacaitself, are wooing me against my will and are wasting my estate. I cantherefore show no attention to strangers, nor suppliants, nor topeople who say that they are skilled artisans, but am all the timebrokenhearted about Ulysses. They want me to marry again at once,and I have to invent stratagems in order to deceive them. In the firstplace heaven put it in my mind to set up a great tambour-frame in myroom, and to begin working upon an enormous piece of fineneedlework. Then I said to them, 'Sweethearts, Ulysses is indeed dead,still, do not press me to marry again immediately; wait- for I wouldnot have my skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havefinished making a pall for the hero Laertes, to be ready against thetime when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the women ofthe place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.' This was what Isaid, and they assented; whereon I used to keep working at my greatweb all day long, but at night I would unpick the stitches again bytorch light. I fooled them in this way for three years without theirfinding it out, but as time wore on and I was now in my fourth year,in the waning of moons, and many days had been accomplished, thosegood-for-nothing hussies my maids betrayed me to the suitors, whobroke in upon me and caught me; they were very angry with me, so I wasforced to finish my work whether I would or no. And now I do not seehow I can find any further shift for getting out of this marriage.My parents are putting great pressure upon me, and my son chafes atthe ravages the suitors are making upon his estate, for he is nowold enough to understand all about it and is perfectly able to lookafter his own affairs, for heaven has blessed him with an excellentdisposition. Still, notwithstanding all this, tell me who you areand where you come from- for you must have had father and mother ofsome sort; you cannot be the son of an oak or of a rock."

提交评论