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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杨树人 大小:YeLFzoxJ43235KB 下载:RAIETXiT55510次
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日期:2020-08-06 09:44:48
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."
2.  As he spoke he went on board, and bade the others do so also andloose the hawsers, so they took their places in the ship. ButTelemachus bound on his sandals, and took a long and doughty spearwith a head of sharpened bronze from the deck of the ship. Then theyloosed the hawsers, thrust the ship off from land, and made on towardsthe city as they had been told to do, while Telemachus strode on asfast as he could, till he reached the homestead where his countlessherds of swine were feeding, and where dwelt the excellentswineherd, who was so devoted a servant to his master.
3.  Aegyptius, a man bent double with age, and of infinite experience,the first to speak His son Antiphus had gone with Ulysses to Ilius,land of noble steeds, but the savage Cyclops had killed him whenthey were all shut up in the cave, and had cooked his last dinnerfor him, He had three sons left, of whom two still worked on theirfather's land, while the third, Eurynomus, was one of the suitors;nevertheless their father could not get over the loss of Antiphus, andwas still weeping for him when he began his speech.
4.  "Sir," said Telemachus, "as regards your question, so long as myfather was here it was well with us and with the house, but the godsin their displeasure have willed it otherwise, and have hidden himaway more closely than mortal man was ever yet hidden. I could haveborne it better even though he were dead, if he had fallen with hismen before Troy, or had died with friends around him when the daysof his fighting were done; for then the Achaeans would have built amound over his ashes, and I should myself have been heir to hisrenown; but now the storm-winds have spirited him away we know notwither; he is gone without leaving so much as a trace behind him,and I inherit nothing but dismay. Nor does the matter end simplywith grief for the loss of my father; heaven has laid sorrows uponme of yet another kind; for the chiefs from all our islands,Dulichium, Same, and the woodland island of Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying their court to my mother, who will neither pointblank say that she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end; sothey are making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so alsowith myself."
5.  "Neptune, however, lay with his daughter, and she had a son byhim, the great Nausithous, who reigned over the Phaecians.Nausithous had two sons Rhexenor and Alcinous; Apollo killed the firstof them while he was still a bridegroom and without male issue; but heleft a daughter Arete, whom Alcinous married, and honours as noother woman is honoured of all those that keep house along withtheir husbands.
6.  Aegyptius, a man bent double with age, and of infinite experience,the first to speak His son Antiphus had gone with Ulysses to Ilius,land of noble steeds, but the savage Cyclops had killed him whenthey were all shut up in the cave, and had cooked his last dinnerfor him, He had three sons left, of whom two still worked on theirfather's land, while the third, Eurynomus, was one of the suitors;nevertheless their father could not get over the loss of Antiphus, andwas still weeping for him when he began his speech.

计划指导

1.  Now Neptune had gone off to the Ethiopians, who are at the world'send, and lie in two halves, the one looking West and the other East.He had gone there to accept a hecatomb of sheep and oxen, and wasenjoying himself at his festival; but the other gods met in thehouse of Olympian Jove, and the sire of gods and men spoke first. Atthat moment he was thinking of Aegisthus, who had been killed byAgamemnon's son Orestes; so he said to the other gods:
2.  Minerva answered, "Do not try to keep me, for I would be on my wayat once. As for any present you may be disposed to make me, keep ittill I come again, and I will take it home with me. You shall giveme a very good one, and I will give you one of no less value inreturn."
3.  The suitors now aimed a second time, but again Minerva made theirweapons for the most part without effect. One hit a bearing-post ofthe cloister; another went against the door; while the pointed shaftof another struck the wall. Still, Amphimedon just took a piece of thetop skin from off Telemachus's wrist, and Ctesippus managed to grazeEumaeus's shoulder above his shield; but the spear went on and fell tothe ground. Then Ulysses and his men let drive into the crowd ofsuitors. Ulysses hit Eurydamas, Telemachus Amphimedon, and EumaeusPolybus. After this the stockman hit Ctesippus in the breast, andtaunted him saying, "Foul-mouthed son of Polytherses, do not be sofoolish as to talk wickedly another time, but let heaven direct yourspeech, for the gods are far stronger than men. I make you a presentof this advice to repay you for the foot which you gave Ulysses whenhe was begging about in his own house."
4.  "My dears, heaven has been pleased to try me with more afflictionthan any other woman of my age and country. First I lost my braveand lion-hearted husband, who had every good quality under heaven, andwhose name was great over all Hellas and middle Argos, and now mydarling son is at the mercy of the winds and waves, without myhaving heard one word about his leaving home. You hussies, there wasnot one of you would so much as think of giving me a call out of mybed, though you all of you very well knew when he was starting. If Ihad known he meant taking this voyage, he would have had to give itup, no matter how much he was bent upon it, or leave me a corpsebehind him- one or other. Now, however, go some of you and call oldDolius, who was given me by my father on my marriage, and who is mygardener. Bid him go at once and tell everything to Laertes, who maybe able to hit on some plan for enlisting public sympathy on our side,as against those who are trying to exterminate his own race and thatof Ulysses."
5.  "Stranger," replied Alcinous, "I am not the kind of man to get angryabout nothing; it is always better to be reasonable; but by FatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, now that I see what kind of person you are,and how much you think as I do, I wish you would stay here, marry mydaughter, and become my son-in-law. If you will stay I will give you ahouse and an estate, but no one (heaven forbid) shall keep you hereagainst your own wish, and that you may be sure of this I willattend to-morrow to the matter of your escort. You can sleep duringthe whole voyage if you like, and the men shall sail you over smoothwaters either to your own home, or wherever you please, even though itbe a long way further off than Euboea, which those of my people whosaw it when they took yellow-haired Rhadamanthus to see Tityus the sonof Gaia, tell me is the furthest of any place- and yet they did thewhole voyage in a single day without distressing themselves, andcame back again afterwards. You will thus see how much my shipsexcel all others, and what magnificent oarsmen my sailors are."
6.  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."

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1.  "When Circe saw me sitting there without eating, and in great grief,she came to me and said, 'Ulysses, why do you sit like that asthough you were dumb, gnawing at your own heart, and refusing bothmeat and drink? Is it that you are still suspicious? You ought notto be, for I have already sworn solemnly that I will not hurt you.'
2.  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."
3.  On this he received Theoclymenus' spear and laid it down on the deckof the ship. He went on board and sat in the stern, biddingTheoclymenus sit beside him; then the men let go the hawsers.Telemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes, and they made allhaste to do so. They set the mast in its socket in the cross plank,raised it and made it fast with the forestays, and they hoistedtheir white sails with sheets of twisted ox hide. Minerva sent thema fair wind that blew fresh and strong to take the ship on hercourse as fast as possible. Thus then they passed by Crouni andChalcis.
4.  "Amphimedon," it said, "what has happened to all you fine young men-all of an age too- that you are come down here under the ground? Onecould pick no finer body of men from any city. Did Neptune raise hiswinds and waves against you when you were at sea, or did yourenemies make an end of you on the mainland when you werecattle-lifting or sheep-stealing, or while fighting in defence oftheir wives and city? Answer my question, for I have been yourguest. Do you not remember how I came to your house with Menelaus,to persuade Ulysses to join us with his ships against Troy? It was awhole month ere we could resume our voyage, for we had hard work topersuade Ulysses to come with us."
5.   They all held their peace until Amphinomus rose to speak. He was theson of Nisus, who was son to king Aretias, and he was foremost amongall the suitors from the wheat-growing and well grassed island ofDulichium; his conversation, moreover, was more agreeable toPenelope than that of any of the other for he was a man of goodnatural disposition. "My friends," said he, speaking to them plainlyand in all honestly, "I am not in favour of killing Telemachus. Itis a heinous thing to kill one who is of noble blood. Let us firsttake counsel of the gods, and if the oracles of Jove advise it, I willboth help to kill him myself, and will urge everyone else to do so;but if they dissuade us, I would have you hold your hands."
6.  "Those who have seen us both," answered Ulysses, "have always saidwe were wonderfully like each other, and now you have noticed it too.

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1.  Ulysses answered, "Take heart and do not trouble yourself aboutthat, but let us go into the house hard by your garden. I have alreadytold Telemachus, Philoetius, and Eumaeus to go on there and get dinnerready as soon as possible."
2.  "All that you have said is true," answered Euryclea, "but let mebring you some clean clothes- a shirt and cloak. Do not keep theserags on your back any longer. It is not right."
3.  Pontonous mixed the wine and handed it to every one in turn; theothers each from his own seat made a drink-offering to the blessedgods that live in heaven, but Ulysses rose and placed the double cupin the hands of queen Arete.
4、  To this Ulysses answered, "Amphinomus, you seem to be a man ofgood understanding, as indeed you may well be, seeing whose son youare. I have heard your father well spoken of; he is Nisus ofDulichium, a man both brave and wealthy. They tell me you are his son,and you appear to be a considerable person; listen, therefore, andtake heed to what I am saying. Man is the vainest of all creaturesthat have their being upon earth. As long as heaven vouchsafes himhealth and strength, he thinks that he shall come to no harmhereafter, and even when the blessed gods bring sorrow upon him, hebears it as he needs must, and makes the best of it; for GodAlmighty gives men their daily minds day by day. I know all aboutit, for I was a rich man once, and did much wrong in thestubbornness of my pride, and in the confidence that my father andmy brothers would support me; therefore let a man fear God in allthings always, and take the good that heaven may see fit to send himwithout vainglory. Consider the infamy of what these suitors aredoing; see how they are wasting the estate, and doing dishonour to thewife, of one who is certain to return some day, and that, too, notlong hence. Nay, he will be here soon; may heaven send you homequietly first that you may not meet with him in the day of his coming,for once he is here the suitors and he will not part bloodlessly."
5、  "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we hadbeen killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and saidto the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live ineverlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship:they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the onething I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or downagain. If they do not square accounts with me about my cows, I will godown to Hades and shine there among the dead.'

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  • 赵彦平 08-05

      "Sir," said Telemachus, "as regards your question, so long as myfather was here it was well with us and with the house, but the godsin their displeasure have willed it otherwise, and have hidden himaway more closely than mortal man was ever yet hidden. I could haveborne it better even though he were dead, if he had fallen with hismen before Troy, or had died with friends around him when the daysof his fighting were done; for then the Achaeans would have built amound over his ashes, and I should myself have been heir to hisrenown; but now the storm-winds have spirited him away we know notwither; he is gone without leaving so much as a trace behind him,and I inherit nothing but dismay. Nor does the matter end simplywith grief for the loss of my father; heaven has laid sorrows uponme of yet another kind; for the chiefs from all our islands,Dulichium, Same, and the woodland island of Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying their court to my mother, who will neither pointblank say that she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end; sothey are making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so alsowith myself."

  • 萨沙·穆斯 08-05

      "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."

  • 董冲 08-05

       Then they roasted the outer meat, drew it off the spits, gaveevery man his portion, and feasted to their hearts' content; those whowaited at table gave Ulysses exactly the same portion as the othershad, for Telemachus had told them to do so.

  • 谭跃 08-05

      Ulysses answered, "I hope you may be as dear to the gods as youare to me, for having saved me from going about and getting intotrouble; there is nothing worse than being always ways on the tramp;still, when men have once got low down in the world they will gothrough a great deal on behalf of their miserable bellies. Sincehowever you press me to stay here and await the return ofTelemachus, tell about Ulysses' mother, and his father whom he left onthe threshold of old age when he set out for Troy. Are they stillliving or are they already dead and in the house of Hades?"

  • 庄立权 08-04

    {  "I went on board, bidding my men to do so also and loose thehawsers; so they took their places and smote the grey sea with theiroars. When we got to the land, which was not far, there, on the faceof a cliff near the sea, we saw a great cave overhung with laurels. Itwas a station for a great many sheep and goats, and outside therewas a large yard, with a high wall round it made of stones builtinto the ground and of trees both pine and oak. This was the abodeof a huge monster who was then away from home shepherding hisflocks. He would have nothing to do with other people, but led thelife of an outlaw. He was a horrid creature, not like a human being atall, but resembling rather some crag that stands out boldly againstthe sky on the top of a high mountain.

  • 温安妮 08-03

      And Ulysses answered, "It would be a long story Madam, were I torelate in full the tale of my misfortunes, for the hand of heavenhas been laid heavy upon me; but as regards your question, there is anisland far away in the sea which is called 'the Ogygian.' Heredwells the cunning and powerful goddess Calypso, daughter of Atlas.She lives by herself far from all neighbours human or divine. Fortune,however, me to her hearth all desolate and alone, for Jove struck myship with his thunderbolts, and broke it up in mid-ocean. My bravecomrades were drowned every man of them, but I stuck to the keel andwas carried hither and thither for the space of nine days, till atlast during the darkness of the tenth night the gods brought me to theOgygian island where the great goddess Calypso lives. She took me inand treated me with the utmost kindness; indeed she wanted to makeme immortal that I might never grow old, but she could not persuade meto let her do so.}

  • 阿莫克 08-03

      Then Telemachus spoke, "Shameless," he cried, "and insolent suitors,let us feast at our pleasure now, and let there be no brawling, for itis a rare thing to hear a man with such a divine voice as Phemius has;but in the morning meet me in full assembly that I may give you formalnotice to depart, and feast at one another's houses, turn and turnabout, at your own cost. If on the other hand you choose to persist inspunging upon one man, heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon withyou in full, and when you fall in my father's house there shall beno man to avenge you."

  • 程鹏飞 08-03

      "Antinous," answered Telemachus, "I cannot eat in peace, nor takepleasure of any kind with such men as you are. Was it not enoughthat you should waste so much good property of mine while I was yeta boy? Now that I am older and know more about it, I am also stronger,and whether here among this people, or by going to Pylos, I will doyou all the harm I can. I shall go, and my going will not be in vainthough, thanks to you suitors, I have neither ship nor crew of my own,and must be passenger not captain."

  • 孙曹 08-02

       And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.

  • 尔沟村 07-31

    {  Thereon he gathered his clouds together, grasped his trident,stirred it round in the sea, and roused the rage of every wind thatblows till earth, sea, and sky were hidden in cloud, and nightsprang forth out of the heavens. Winds from East, South, North, andWest fell upon him all at the same time, and a tremendous sea gotup, so that Ulysses' heart began to fail him. "Alas," he said tohimself in his dismay, "what ever will become of me? I am afraidCalypso was right when she said I should have trouble by sea beforeI got back home. It is all coming true. How black is Jove makingheaven with his clouds, and what a sea the winds are raising fromevery quarter at once. I am now safe to perish. Blest and thrice blestwere those Danaans who fell before Troy in the cause of the sons ofAtreus. Would that had been killed on the day when the Trojans werepressing me so sorely about the dead body of Achilles, for then Ishould have had due burial and the Achaeans would have honoured myname; but now it seems that I shall come to a most pitiable end."

  • 钱维军 07-31

      "More's the pity," answered Telemachus, "I am sorry for him, butwe must leave him to himself just now. If people could have everythingtheir own way, the first thing I should choose would be the returnof my father; but go, and give your message; then make haste backagain, and do not turn out of your way to tell Laertes. Tell my motherto send one of her women secretly with the news at once, and let himhear it from her."

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