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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:陆兆禧 大小:jtq7eqMl96919KB 下载:tgWlr9eN97151次
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日期:2020-08-06 06:33:32
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巴宝莉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  On this pale fear laid hold of them, and old Halitherses, son ofMastor, rose to speak, for he was the only man among them who knewboth past and future; so he spoke to them plainly and in allhonesty, saying,
2.  And the ghost of Amphimedon answered, "Agamemnon, son of Atreus,king of men, I remember everything that you have said, and will tellyou fully and accurately about the way in which our end was broughtabout. Ulysses had been long gone, and we were courting his wife,who did not say point blank that she would not marry, nor yet bringmatters to an end, for she meant to compass our destruction: this,then, was the trick she played us. She set up a great tambour frame inher room and began to work on an enormous piece of fine needlework.'Sweethearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeed dead, still, do notpress me to marry again immediately; wait- for I would not have myskill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I have completed a pallfor the hero Laertes, against the time when death shall take him. Heis very rich, and the women of the place will talk if he is laid outwithout a pall.' This is what she said, and we assented; whereuponwe could see her working upon her great web all day long, but at nightshe would unpick the stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us inthis way for three years without our finding it out, but as timewore on and she was now in her fourth year, in the waning of moons andmany days had been accomplished, one of her maids who knew what shewas doing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work,so she had to finish it whether she would or no; and when she showedus the robe she had made, after she had had it washed, its splendourwas as that of the sun or moon.
3.  Then Minerva answered, "Sir, you have spoken well, and it will bemuch better that Telemachus should do as you have said; he, therefore,shall return with you and sleep at your house, but I must go back togive orders to my crew, and keep them in good heart. I am the onlyolder person among them; the rest are all young men of Telemachus' ownage, who have taken this voyage out of friendship; so I must return tothe ship and sleep there. Moreover to-morrow I must go to theCauconians where I have a large sum of money long owing to me. Asfor Telemachus, now that he is your guest, send him to Lacedaemon in achariot, and let one of your sons go with him. Be pleased also toprovide him with your best and fleetest horses."
4.  This was what he said, and more than half raised a loud shout, andat once left the assembly. But the rest stayed where they were, forthe speech of Halitherses displeased them, and they sided withEupeithes; they therefore hurried off for their armour, and whenthey had armed themselves, they met together in front of the city, andEupeithes led them on in their folly. He thought he was going toavenge the murder of his son, whereas in truth he was never to return,but was himself to perish in his attempt.
5.  As she spoke she shed sleep over his eyes, and then went back toOlympus.
6.  Telemachus gave him no heed, but sat silently watching his father,expecting every moment that he would begin his attack upon thesuitors.

计划指导

1.  "And I answered, 'Circe, how can you expect me to be friendly withyou when you have just been turning all my men into pigs? And now thatyou have got me here myself, you mean me mischief when you ask me togo to bed with you, and will unman me and make me fit for nothing. Ishall certainly not consent to go to bed with you unless you willfirst take your solemn oath to plot no further harm against me.'
2.  The foot races came first. The course was set out for them fromthe starting post, and they raised a dust upon the plain as they allflew forward at the same moment. Clytoneus came in first by a longway; he left every one else behind him by the length of the furrowthat a couple of mules can plough in a fallow field. They thenturned to the painful art of wrestling, and here Euryalus proved to bethe best man. Amphialus excelled all the others in jumping, while atthrowing the disc there was no one who could approach Elatreus.Alcinous's son Laodamas was the best boxer, and he it was whopresently said, when they had all been diverted with the games, "Letus ask the stranger whether he excels in any of these sports; he seemsvery powerfully built; his thighs, claves, hands, and neck are ofprodigious strength, nor is he at all old, but he has suffered muchlately, and there is nothing like the sea for making havoc with a man,no matter how strong he is."
3.  Then she went back to Olympus; but Telemachus stirred Pisistratuswith his heel to rouse him, and said, "Wake up Pisistratus, and yokethe horses to the chariot, for we must set off home."
4.  "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."
5.  As he spoke he went inside the buildings to the cloister where thesuitors were, but Argos died as soon as he had recognized his master.
6.  On this she led the way, while Telemachus followed in her steps.When they got to the ship they found the crew waiting by the waterside, and Telemachus said, "Now my men, help me to get the stores onboard; they are all put together in the cloister, and my mother doesnot know anything about it, nor any of the maid servants except one."

推荐功能

1.  When the pair had thus laid their plans they parted, and the goddesswent straight to Lacedaemon to fetch Telemachus.
2.  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.
3.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Menelausrose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to his comelyfeet, girded his sword about his shoulders, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. Then, taking a seat near Telemachus hesaid:
4.  Ulysses smiled at this, and said to Telemachus, "Let your mother putme to any proof she likes; she will make up her mind about itpresently. She rejects me for the moment and believes me to besomebody else, because I am covered with dirt and have such badclothes on; let us, however, consider what we had better do next. Whenone man has killed another, even though he was not one who would leavemany friends to take up his quarrel, the man who has killed him muststill say good bye to his friends and fly the country; whereas we havebeen killing the stay of a whole town, and all the picked youth ofIthaca. I would have you consider this matter."
5.   He then chose twenty men, and they went down to their. ship and tothe sea side; they drew the vessel into the water and got her mast andsails inside her; they bound the oars to the thole-pins with twistedthongs of leather, all in due course, and spread the white sailsaloft, while their fine servants brought them their armour. Thenthey made the ship fast a little way out, came on shore again, gottheir suppers, and waited till night should fall.
6.  "And I said, 'Agamemnon, why do you ask me? I do not know whetheryour son is alive or dead, and it is not right to talk when one doesnot know.'

应用

1.  While he was thus in two minds, Neptune sent a terrible great wavethat seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over theraft, which then went to pieces as though it were a heap of drychaff tossed about by a whirlwind. Ulysses got astride of one plankand rode upon it as if he were on horseback; he then took off theclothes Calypso had given him, bound Ino's veil under his arms, andplunged into the sea- meaning to swim on shore. King Neptune watchedhim as he did so, and wagged his head, muttering to himself andsaying, "'There now, swim up and down as you best can till you fall inwith well-to-do people. I do not think you will be able to say thatI have let you off too lightly." On this he lashed his horses anddrove to Aegae where his palace is.
2.  The bard inspired of heaven took up the story at the point wheresome of the Argives set fire to their tents and sailed away whileothers, hidden within the horse, were waiting with Ulysses in theTrojan place of assembly. For the Trojans themselves had drawn thehorse into their fortress, and it stood there while they sat incouncil round it, and were in three minds as to what they should do.Some were for breaking it up then and there; others would have itdragged to the top of the rock on which the fortress stood, and thenthrown down the precipice; while yet others were for letting it remainas an offering and propitiation for the gods. And this was how theysettled it in the end, for the city was doomed when it took in thathorse, within which were all the bravest of the Argives waiting tobring death and destruction on the Trojans. Anon he sang how thesons of the Achaeans issued from the horse, and sacked the town,breaking out from their ambuscade. He sang how they over ran thecity hither and thither and ravaged it, and how Ulysses went raginglike Mars along with Menelaus to the house of Deiphobus. It wasthere that the fight raged most furiously, nevertheless by Minerva'shelp he was victorious.
3.  The suitors then returned to their singing and dancing until theevening; but when night fell upon their pleasuring they went home tobed each in his own abode. Telemachus's room was high up in a towerthat looked on to the outer court; hither, then, he hied, brooding andfull of thought. A good old woman, Euryclea, daughter of Ops, theson of Pisenor, went before him with a couple of blazing torches.Laertes had bought her with his own money when she was quite young; hegave the worth of twenty oxen for her, and shewed as much respect toher in his household as he did to his own wedded wife, but he didnot take her to his bed for he feared his wife's resentment. She itwas who now lighted Telemachus to his room, and she loved him betterthan any of the other women in the house did, for she had nursed himwhen he was a baby. He opened the door of his bed room and sat downupon the bed; as he took off his shirt he gave it to the good oldwoman, who folded it tidily up, and hung it for him over a peg byhis bed side, after which she went out, pulled the door to by a silvercatch, and drew the bolt home by means of the strap. But Telemachus ashe lay covered with a woollen fleece kept thinking all night throughof his intended voyage of the counsel that Minerva had given him.
4、  "I will tell you truly," answered Nestor, "and indeed you haveyourself divined how it all happened. If Menelaus when he got backfrom Troy had found Aegisthus still alive in his house, there wouldhave been no barrow heaped up for him, not even when he was dead,but he would have been thrown outside the city to dogs and vultures,and not a woman would have mourned him, for he had done a deed ofgreat wickedness; but we were over there, fighting hard at Troy, andAegisthus who was taking his ease quietly in the heart of Argos,cajoled Agamemnon's wife Clytemnestra with incessant flattery.
5、  "'You will want no guide,' she answered; 'raise you mast, set yourwhite sails, sit quite still, and the North Wind will blow you thereof itself. When your ship has traversed the waters of Oceanus, youwill reach the fertile shore of Proserpine's country with its grovesof tall poplars and willows that shed their fruit untimely; here beachyour ship upon the shore of Oceanus, and go straight on to the darkabode of Hades. You will find it near the place where the riversPyriphlegethon and Cocytus (which is a branch of the river Styx)flow into Acheron, and you will see a rock near it, just where the tworoaring rivers run into one another.

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  • 杨跃进 08-05

      "Telemachus," said she, addressing her son, "I fear you are nolonger so discreet and well conducted as you used to be. When you wereyounger you had a greater sense of propriety; now, however, that youare grown up, though a stranger to look at you would take you forthe son of a well-to-do father as far as size and good looks go,your conduct is by no means what it should be. What is all thisdisturbance that has been going on, and how came you to allow astranger to be so disgracefully ill-treated? What would havehappened if he had suffered serious injury while a suppliant in ourhouse? Surely this would have been very discreditable to you."

  • 陈道胜 08-05

      The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."

  • 祝寿歌 08-05

       Ulysses smiled at this, and said to Telemachus, "Let your mother putme to any proof she likes; she will make up her mind about itpresently. She rejects me for the moment and believes me to besomebody else, because I am covered with dirt and have such badclothes on; let us, however, consider what we had better do next. Whenone man has killed another, even though he was not one who would leavemany friends to take up his quarrel, the man who has killed him muststill say good bye to his friends and fly the country; whereas we havebeen killing the stay of a whole town, and all the picked youth ofIthaca. I would have you consider this matter."

  • 许世友 08-05

      And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."

  • 邓海光 08-04

    {  Menelaus smiled and took Telemachus's hand within his own. "What yousay," said he, "shows that you come of good family. I both can, andwill, make this exchange for you, by giving you the finest and mostprecious piece of plate in all my house. It is a mixing-bowl byVulcan's own hand, of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaidwith gold. Phaedimus, king of the Sidonians, gave it me in thecourse of a visit which I paid him when I returned thither on myhomeward journey. I will make you a present of it."

  • 孟永范 08-03

      "When we reached the harbour we found it land-locked under steepcliffs, with a narrow entrance between two headlands. My captains tookall their ships inside, and made them fast close to one another, forthere was never so much as a breath of wind inside, but it wasalways dead calm. I kept my own ship outside, and moored it to arock at the very end of the point; then I climbed a high rock toreconnoitre, but could see no sign neither of man nor cattle, onlysome smoke rising from the ground. So I sent two of my company with anattendant to find out what sort of people the inhabitants were.}

  • 查忠平 08-03

      The others all agreed, but Ulysses, to throw them off the scent,said, "Sirs, an old man like myself, worn out with suffering, cannothold his own against a young one; but my irrepressible belly urgesme on, though I know it can only end in my getting a drubbing. Youmust swear, however that none of you will give me a foul blow tofavour Irus and secure him the victory."

  • 方逸 08-03

      Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Melanthius was again going tothe store room to fetch more armour, but the swineherd saw him andsaid to Ulysses who was beside him, "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, itis that scoundrel Melanthius, just as we suspected, who is going tothe store room. Say, shall I kill him, if I can get the better of him,or shall I bring him here that you may take your own revenge for allthe many wrongs that he has done in your house?"

  • 张鸿 08-02

       "After him I saw huge Orion in a meadow full of asphodel driving theghosts of the wild beasts that he had killed upon the mountains, andhe had a great bronze club in his hand, unbreakable for ever and ever.

  • 祝贺语 07-31

    {  "He said this to draw me out, but I was too cunning to be caughtin that way, so I answered with a lie; 'Neptune,' said I, 'sent myship on to the rocks at the far end of your country, and wrecked it.We were driven on to them from the open sea, but I and those who arewith me escaped the jaws of death.'

  • 许章强 07-31

      "And I said, 'In truth Jove has hated the house of Atreus from firstto last in the matter of their women's counsels. See how many of usfell for Helen's sake, and now it seems that Clytemnestra hatchedmischief against too during your absence.'

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