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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:黎寿钦 大小:FuCgLxvG13972KB 下载:okOZFsNL39975次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:c04RGBRj29326条
日期:2020-08-06 10:32:06
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周茂非

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Penelope's heart sank within her, and for a long time she wasspeechless; her eyes filled with tears, and she could find noutterance. At last, however, she said, "Why did my son leave me?What business had he to go sailing off in ships that make long voyagesover the ocean like sea-horses? Does he want to die without leavingany one behind him to keep up his name?"
2.  Melanthius lit the fire, and set a seat covered with sheep skinsbeside it. He also brought a great ball of lard from what they hadin the house, and the suitors warmed the bow and again made trial ofit, but they were none of them nearly strong enough to string it.Nevertheless there still remained Antinous and Eurymachus, who werethe ringleaders among the suitors and much the foremost among themall.
3.  "Fountain nymphs," he cried, "children of Jove, if ever Ulyssesburned you thigh bones covered with fat whether of lambs or kids,grant my prayer that heaven may send him home. He would soon put anend to the swaggering threats with which such men as you go aboutinsulting people-gadding all over the town while your flocks are goingto ruin through bad shepherding."
4.  So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had gotsafely home except Ulysses, and he, though he was longing to return tohis wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had gothim into a large cave and wanted to marry him. But as years went by,there came a time when the gods settled that he should go back toIthaca; even then, however, when he was among his own people, histroubles were not yet over; nevertheless all the gods had now begun topity him except Neptune, who still persecuted him without ceasingand would not let him get home.
5.  "May Jove so grant it," replied Telemachus; "if it should prove tobe so, I will make vows to you as though you were a god, even when Iam at home."
6.  "Stranger," replied Eumaeus, "as regards your question: sit still,make yourself comfortable, drink your wine, and listen to me. Thenights are now at their longest; there is plenty of time both forsleeping and sitting up talking together; you ought not to go to bedtill bed time, too much sleep is as bad as too little; if any one ofthe others wishes to go to bed let him leave us and do so; he can thentake my master's pigs out when he has done breakfast in the morning.We two will sit here eating and drinking in the hut, and telling oneanother stories about our misfortunes; for when a man has sufferedmuch, and been buffeted about in the world, he takes pleasure inrecalling the memory of sorrows that have long gone by. As regardsyour question, then, my tale is as follows:

计划指导

1.  When Ulysses and Penelope had had their fill of love they felltalking with one another. She told him how much she had had to bear inseeing the house filled with a crowd of wicked suitors who hadkilled so many sheep and oxen on her account, and had drunk so manycasks of wine. Ulysses in his turn told her what he had suffered,and how much trouble he had himself given to other people. He told hereverything, and she was so delighted to listen that she never wentto sleep till he had ended his whole story.
2.  When Ulysses and Penelope had had their fill of love they felltalking with one another. She told him how much she had had to bear inseeing the house filled with a crowd of wicked suitors who hadkilled so many sheep and oxen on her account, and had drunk so manycasks of wine. Ulysses in his turn told her what he had suffered,and how much trouble he had himself given to other people. He told hereverything, and she was so delighted to listen that she never wentto sleep till he had ended his whole story.
3.  "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.
4.  With these words he led the way and the others followed after.When they had brought the things as he told them, Telemachus went onboard, Minerva going before him and taking her seat in the stern ofthe vessel, while Telemachus sat beside her. Then the men loosed thehawsers and took their places on the benches. Minerva sent them a fairwind from the West, that whistled over the deep blue waves whereonTelemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes and hoist sail, andthey did as he told them. They set the mast in its socket in the crossplank, raised it, and made it fast with the forestays; then theyhoisted their white sails aloft with ropes of twisted ox hide. Asthe sail bellied out with the wind, the ship flew through the deepblue water, and the foam hissed against her bows as she sped onward.Then they made all fast throughout the ship, filled the mixing-bowlsto the brim, and made drink offerings to the immortal gods that arefrom everlasting, but more particularly to the grey-eyed daughter ofJove.
5.  Ulysses answered, "Eumaeus, I have heard the story of yourmisfortunes with the most lively interest and pity, but Jove has givenyou good as well as evil, for in spite of everything you have a goodmaster, who sees that you always have enough to eat and drink; and youlead a good life, whereas I am still going about begging my way fromcity to city."
6.  She then went upstairs to her own room, not alone, but attended byher maidens, and when there, she lamented her dear husband tillMinerva shed sweet sleep over her eyelids.

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1.  "How sad," exclaimed Telemachus, "that all this was of no avail tosave him, nor yet his own iron courage. But now, sir, be pleased tosend us all to bed, that we may lie down and enjoy the blessed boon ofsleep."
2.  When the servants had washed them and anointed them with oil, theybrought them woollen cloaks and shirts, and the two took their seatsby the side of Menelaus. A maidservant brought them water in abeautiful golden ewer, and poured it into a silver basin for them towash their hands; and she drew a clean table beside them. An upperservant brought them bread, and offered them many good things ofwhat there was in the house, while the carver fetched them plates ofall manner of meats and set cups of gold by their side.
3.  "My good nurse," answered Penelope, "you must be mad. The godssometimes send some very sensible people out of their minds, andmake foolish people become sensible. This is what they must havebeen doing to you; for you always used to be a reasonable person.Why should you thus mock me when I have trouble enough already-talking such nonsense, and waking me up out of a sweet sleep thathad taken possession of my eyes and closed them? I have never slept sosoundly from the day my poor husband went to that city with theill-omened name. Go back again into the women's room; if it had beenany one else, who had woke me up to bring me such absurd news I shouldhave sent her away with a severe scolding. As it is, your age shallprotect you."
4.  "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."
5.   As she spoke, she told Eumaeus to set the bow and the pieces of ironbefore the suitors, and Eumaeus wept as he took them to do as shehad bidden him. Hard by, the stockman wept also when he saw hismaster's bow, but Antinous scolded them. "You country louts," said he,"silly simpletons; why should you add to the sorrows of yourmistress by crying in this way? She has enough to grieve her in theloss of her husband; sit still, therefore, and eat your dinners insilence, or go outside if you want to cry, and leave the bow behindyou. We suitors shall have to contend for it with might and main,for we shall find it no light matter to string such a bow as thisis. There is not a man of us all who is such another as Ulysses; for Ihave seen him and remember him, though I was then only a child."
6.  "On this he groaned, and cried out, 'Alas, alas, then the oldprophecy about me is coming true. There was a prophet here, at onetime, a man both brave and of great stature, Telemus son of Eurymus,who was an excellent seer, and did all the prophesying for theCyclopes till he grew old; he told me that all this would happen to mesome day, and said I should lose my sight by the hand of Ulysses. Ihave been all along expecting some one of imposing presence andsuperhuman strength, whereas he turns out to be a little insignificantweakling, who has managed to blind my eye by taking advantage of me inmy drink; come here, then, Ulysses, that I may make you presents toshow my hospitality, and urge Neptune to help you forward on yourjourney- for Neptune and I are father and son. He, if he so will,shall heal me, which no one else neither god nor man can do.'

应用

1.  While he was thus in two minds Helen came down from her high vaultedand perfumed room, looking as lovely as Diana herself. Adraste broughther a seat, Alcippe a soft woollen rug while Phylo fetched her thesilver work-box which Alcandra wife of Polybus had given her.Polybus lived in Egyptian Thebes, which is the richest city in thewhole world; he gave Menelaus two baths, both of pure silver, twotripods, and ten talents of gold; besides all this, his wife gaveHelen some beautiful presents, to wit, a golden distaff, and asilver work-box that ran on wheels, with a gold band round the topof it. Phylo now placed this by her side, full of fine spun yarn,and a distaff charged with violet coloured wool was laid upon thetop of it. Then Helen took her seat, put her feet upon thefootstool, and began to question her husband.
2.  The swineherd went back when he heard this, and Penelope said as shesaw him cross the threshold, "Why do you not bring him here,Eumaeus? Is he afraid that some one will ill-treat him, or is he shyof coming inside the house at all? Beggars should not be shamefaced."
3.  "'When you get home you will take your revenge on these suitors; andafter you have killed them by force or fraud in your own house, youmust take a well-made oar and carry it on and on, till you come to acountry where the people have never heard of the sea and do not evenmix salt with their food, nor do they know anything about ships, andoars that are as the wings of a ship. I will give you this certaintoken which cannot escape your notice. A wayfarer will meet you andwill say it must be a winnowing shovel that you have got upon yourshoulder; on this you must fix the oar in the ground and sacrifice aram, a bull, and a boar to Neptune. Then go home and offer hecatombsto an the gods in heaven one after the other. As for yourself, deathshall come to you from the sea, and your life shall ebb away verygently when you are full of years and peace of mind, and your peopleshall bless you. All that I have said will come true].'
4、  The suitors all came up laughing, and gathered round the tworagged tramps. "Listen to me," said Antinous, "there are some goats'paunches down at the fire, which we have filled with blood and fat,and set aside for supper; he who is victorious and proves himself tobe the better man shall have his pick of the lot; he shall be freeof our table and we will not allow any other beggar about the house atall."
5、  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."

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  • 黄金裕 08-05

      So saying she bound on her glittering golden sandals,imperishable, with which she can fly like the wind over land or sea;she grasped the redoubtable bronze-shod spear, so stout and sturdy andstrong, wherewith she quells the ranks of heroes who have displeasedher, and down she darted from the topmost summits of Olympus,whereon forthwith she was in Ithaca, at the gateway of Ulysses' house,disguised as a visitor, Mentes, chief of the Taphians, and she helda bronze spear in her hand. There she found the lordly suitorsseated on hides of the oxen which they had killed and eaten, andplaying draughts in front of the house. Men-servants and pages werebustling about to wait upon them, some mixing wine with water in themixing-bowls, some cleaning down the tables with wet sponges andlaying them out again, and some cutting up great quantities of meat.

  • 李建国 08-05

      BOOK XXIV.

  • 马越飞 08-05

       Thus did he speak. The others all of them applauded his saying,and sent their servants to fetch the presents. Then Euryalus said,"King Alcinous, I will give the stranger all the satisfaction yourequire. He shall have sword, which is of bronze, all but the hilt,which is of silver. I will also give him the scabbard of newly sawnivory into which it fits. It will be worth a great deal to him."

  • 张希贤 08-05

      Eumaeus answered, "Old man, no traveller who comes here with newswill get Ulysses' wife and son to believe his story. Nevertheless,tramps in want of a lodging keep coming with their mouths full oflies, and not a word of truth; every one who finds his way to Ithacagoes to my mistress and tells her falsehoods, whereon she takes themin, makes much of them, and asks them all manner of questions,crying all the time as women will when they have lost theirhusbands. And you too, old man, for a shirt and a cloak woulddoubtless make up a very pretty story. But the wolves and birds ofprey have long since torn Ulysses to pieces, or the fishes of thesea have eaten him, and his bones are lying buried deep in sand uponsome foreign shore; he is dead and gone, and a bad business it isfor all his friends- for me especially; go where I may I shall neverfind so good a master, not even if I were to go home to my motherand father where I was bred and born. I do not so much care,however, about my parents now, though I should dearly like to see themagain in my own country; it is the loss of Ulysses that grieves memost; I cannot speak of him without reverence though he is here nolonger, for he was very fond of me, and took such care of me thatwhereever he may be I shall always honour his memory."

  • 胡府 08-04

    {  "As for me I live out of the way here with the pigs, and never go tothe town unless when Penelope sends for me on the arrival of some newsabout Ulysses. Then they all sit round and ask questions, both thosewho grieve over the king's absence, and those who rejoice at itbecause they can eat up his property without paying for it. For my ownpart I have never cared about asking anyone else since the time when Iwas taken in by an Aetolian, who had killed a man and come a longway till at last he reached my station, and I was very kind to him. Hesaid he had seen Ulysses with Idomeneus among the Cretans, refittinghis ships which had been damaged in a gale. He said Ulysses wouldreturn in the following summer or autumn with his men, and that hewould bring back much wealth. And now you, you unfortunate old man,since fate has brought you to my door, do not try to flatter me inthis way with vain hopes. It is not for any such reason that I shalltreat you kindly, but only out of respect for Jove the god ofhospitality, as fearing him and pitying you."

  • 何明一 08-03

      "Telemachus," said she, addressing her son, "I fear you are nolonger so discreet and well conducted as you used to be. When you wereyounger you had a greater sense of propriety; now, however, that youare grown up, though a stranger to look at you would take you forthe son of a well-to-do father as far as size and good looks go,your conduct is by no means what it should be. What is all thisdisturbance that has been going on, and how came you to allow astranger to be so disgracefully ill-treated? What would havehappened if he had suffered serious injury while a suppliant in ourhouse? Surely this would have been very discreditable to you."}

  • 颜沛青 08-03

      "Then, being much troubled in mind, I said to my men, 'My friends,it is not right that one or two of us alone should know the propheciesthat Circe has made me, I will therefore tell you about them, sothat whether we live or die we may do so with our eyes open. First shesaid we were to keep clear of the Sirens, who sit and sing mostbeautifully in a field of flowers; but she said I might hear themmyself so long as no one else did. Therefore, take me and bind me tothe crosspiece half way up the mast; bind me as I stand upright,with a bond so fast that I cannot possibly break away, and lash therope's ends to the mast itself. If I beg and pray you to set mefree, then bind me more tightly still.'

  • 刘胜利 08-03

      Then Ulysses said, "Sir, I do not want to stay here; a beggar canalways do better in town than country, for any one who likes cangive him something. I am too old to care about remaining here at thebeck and call of a master. Therefore let this man do as you havejust told him, and take me to the town as soon as I have had a warm bythe fire, and the day has got a little heat in it. My clothes arewretchedly thin, and this frosty morning I shall be perished withcold, for you say the city is some way off."

  • 吉羽匡 08-02

       "Look to it yourself, father," answered Telemachus, "for they sayyou are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no othermortal man who can compare with you. We will follow you with rightgood will, nor shall you find us fail you in so far as our strengthholds out."

  • 陈舰利 07-31

    {  "I will tell you then truth," replied her son. "We went to Pylos andsaw Nestor, who took me to his house and treated me as hospitably asthough I were a son of his own who had just returned after a longabsence; so also did his sons; but he said he had not heard a wordfrom any human being about Ulysses, whether he was alive or dead. Hesent me, therefore, with a chariot and horses to Menelaus. There I sawHelen, for whose sake so many, both Argives and Trojans, were inheaven's wisdom doomed to suffer. Menelaus asked me what it was thathad brought me to Lacedaemon, and I told him the whole truth,whereon he said, 'So, then, these cowards would usurp a brave man'sbed? A hind might as well lay her new-born young in the lair of alion, and then go off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell.The lion, when he comes back to his lair, will make short work withthe pair of them, and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By fatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he waswhen he wrestled with Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him soheavily that all the Greeks cheered him- if he is still such, and wereto come near these suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorrywedding. As regards your question, however, I will not prevaricate nordeceive you, but what the old man of the sea told me, so much will Itell you in full. He said he could see Ulysses on an islandsorrowing bitterly in the house of the nymph Calypso, who waskeeping him prisoner, and he could not reach his home, for he had noships nor sailors to take him over the sea.' This was what Menelaustold me, and when I had heard his story I came away; the gods thengave me a fair wind and soon brought me safe home again."

  • 夏克斌 07-31

      Then Minerva answered, "Sir, you have spoken well, and it will bemuch better that Telemachus should do as you have said; he, therefore,shall return with you and sleep at your house, but I must go back togive orders to my crew, and keep them in good heart. I am the onlyolder person among them; the rest are all young men of Telemachus' ownage, who have taken this voyage out of friendship; so I must return tothe ship and sleep there. Moreover to-morrow I must go to theCauconians where I have a large sum of money long owing to me. Asfor Telemachus, now that he is your guest, send him to Lacedaemon in achariot, and let one of your sons go with him. Be pleased also toprovide him with your best and fleetest horses."

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