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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:蓝苹 大小:WtnSU30h46732KB 下载:DT6dY7GT42586次
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日期:2020-08-06 21:48:50
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拉宾德拉纳特·泰戈尔

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Eurymachus, son of Polybus, answered, "It rests with heavento decide who shall be chief among us, but you shall be master in yourown house and over your own possessions; no one while there is a manin Ithaca shall do you violence nor rob you. And now, my goodfellow, I want to know about this stranger. What country does hecome from? Of what family is he, and where is his estate? Has hebrought you news about the return of your father, or was he onbusiness of his own? He seemed a well-to-do man, but he hurried off sosuddenly that he was gone in a moment before we could get to knowhim."
2.  "Thus, then, did we wait in great fear of mind till morning came,but when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, themale sheep hurried out to feed, while the ewes remained bleating aboutthe pens waiting to be milked, for their udders were full to bursting;but their master in spite of all his pain felt the backs of all thesheep as they stood upright, without being sharp enough to find outthat the men were underneath their bellies. As the ram was goingout, last of all, heavy with its fleece and with the weight of mycrafty self; Polyphemus laid hold of it and said:
3.  "I will tell you everything," answered Ulysses, "quite truly. I comefrom Alybas, where I have a fine house. I am son of king Apheidas, whois the son of Polypemon. My own name is Eperitus; heaven drove meoff my course as I was leaving Sicania, and I have been carried hereagainst my will. As for my ship it is lying over yonder, off theopen country outside the town, and this is the fifth year sinceUlysses left my country. Poor fellow, yet the omens were good forhim when he left me. The birds all flew on our right hands, and bothhe and I rejoiced to see them as we parted, for we had every hope thatwe should have another friendly meeting and exchange presents."
4.  With these words she came down from her upper room, not alone butattended by two of her maidens, and when she reached the suitors shestood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a staid maid servant oneither side of her. As they beheld her the suitors were so overpoweredand became so desperately enamoured of her, that each one prayed hemight win her for his own bed fellow.
5.  Ulysses smiled at him and answered, "Fear not; Telemachus hassaved your life, that you may know in future, and tell other people,how greatly better good deeds prosper than evil ones. Go, therefore,outside the cloisters into the outer court, and be out of the way ofthe slaughter- you and the bard- while I finish my work here inside."
6.  "I will tell you the truth, my son," replied Ulysses. "It was thePhaeacians who brought me here. They are great sailors, and are in thehabit of giving escorts to any one who reaches their coasts. They tookme over the sea while I was fast asleep, and landed me in Ithaca,after giving me many presents in bronze, gold, and raiment. Thesethings by heaven's mercy are lying concealed in a cave, and I am nowcome here on the suggestion of Minerva that we may consult aboutkilling our enemies. First, therefore, give me a list of thesuitors, with their number, that I may learn who, and how many, theyare. I can then turn the matter over in my mind, and see whether wetwo can fight the whole body of them ourselves, or whether we mustfind others to help us."

计划指导

1.  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."
2.  Then Medon said, "I wish, Madam, that this were all; but they areplotting something much more dreadful now- may heaven frustratetheir design. They are going to try and murder Telemachus as he iscoming home from Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to get newsof his father."
3.  Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs or aiming with spears at amark on the levelled ground in front of Ulysses' house, and werebehaving with all their old insolence. Antinous and Eurymachus, whowere their ringleaders and much the foremost among them all, weresitting together when Noemon son of Phronius came up and said toAntinous,
4.  Then the old woman took the cauldron in which she was going towash his feet, and poured plenty of cold water into it, adding hottill the bath was warm enough. Ulysses sat by the fire, but ere longhe turned away from the light, for it occurred to him that when theold woman had hold of his leg she would recognize a certain scar whichit bore, whereon the whole truth would come out. And indeed as soon asshe began washing her master, she at once knew the scar as one thathad been given him by a wild boar when he was hunting on MountParnassus with his excellent grandfather Autolycus- who was the mostaccomplished thief and perjurer in the whole world- and with thesons of Autolycus. Mercury himself had endowed him with this gift, forhe used to burn the thigh bones of goats and kids to him, so he tookpleasure in his companionship. It happened once that Autolycus hadgone to Ithaca and had found the child of his daughter just born. Assoon as he had done supper Euryclea set the infant upon his kneesand said, you must find a name for your grandson; you greatly wishedthat you might have one."
5.  Now when Penelope heard that the beggar had been struck in thebanqueting-cloister, she said before her maids, "Would that Apollowould so strike you, Antinous," and her waiting woman Eurynomeanswered, "If our prayers were answered not one of the suitors wouldever again see the sun rise." Then Penelope said, "Nurse, I hate everysingle one of them, for they mean nothing but mischief, but I hateAntinous like the darkness of death itself. A poor unfortunate tramphas come begging about the house for sheer want. Every one else hasgiven him something to put in his wallet, but Antinous has hit himon the right shoulder-blade with a footstool."
6.  Then Eurymachus, son of Polybus, answered, "It rests with heavento decide who shall be chief among us, but you shall be master in yourown house and over your own possessions; no one while there is a manin Ithaca shall do you violence nor rob you. And now, my goodfellow, I want to know about this stranger. What country does hecome from? Of what family is he, and where is his estate? Has hebrought you news about the return of your father, or was he onbusiness of his own? He seemed a well-to-do man, but he hurried off sosuddenly that he was gone in a moment before we could get to knowhim."

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1.  Then Melanthius the goatherd answered, "You ill-conditioned cur,what are you talking about? Some day or other I will put you onboard ship and take you to a foreign country, where I can sell you andpocket the money you will fetch. I wish I were as sure that Apollowould strike Telemachus dead this very day, or that the suitorswould kill him, as I am that Ulysses will never come home again."
2.  A dark cloud of sorrow fell upon Laertes as he listened. He filledboth hands with the dust from off the ground and poured it over hisgrey head, groaning heavily as he did so. The heart of Ulysses wastouched, and his nostrils quivered as he looked upon his father;then he sprang towards him, flung his arms about him and kissed him,saying, "I am he, father, about whom you are asking- I have returnedafter having been away for twenty years. But cease your sighing andlamentation- we have no time to lose, for I should tell you that Ihave been killing the suitors in my house, to punish them for theirinsolence and crimes."
3.  Then was Ulysses glad and prayed aloud saying, "Father Jove, grantthat Alcinous may do all as he has said, for so he will win animperishable name among mankind, and at the same time I shall returnto my country."
4.  This made Antinous very angry, and he scowled at him saying, "Youshall pay for this before you get clear of the court." With thesewords he threw a footstool at him, and hit him on the rightshoulder-blade near the top of his back. Ulysses stood firm as arock and the blow did not even stagger him, but he shook his head insilence as he brooded on his revenge. Then he went back to thethreshold and sat down there, laying his well-filled wallet at hisfeet.
5.   Calypso knew him at once- for the gods all know each other, nomatter how far they live from one another- but Ulysses was not within;he was on the sea-shore as usual, looking out upon the barren oceanwith tears in his eyes, groaning and breaking his heart for sorrow.Calypso gave Mercury a seat and said: "Why have you come to see me,Mercury- honoured, and ever welcome- for you do not visit me often?Say what you want; I will do it for be you at once if I can, and if itcan be done at all; but come inside, and let me set refreshment beforeyou.
6.  Leiocritus, son of Evenor, answered him saying, "Mentor, whatfolly is all this, that you should set the people to stay us? It isa hard thing for one man to fight with many about his victuals. Eventhough Ulysses himself were to set upon us while we are feasting inhis house, and do his best to oust us, his wife, who wants him back sovery badly, would have small cause for rejoicing, and his bloodwould be upon his own head if he fought against such great odds. Thereis no sense in what you have been saying. Now, therefore, do youpeople go about your business, and let his father's old friends,Mentor and Halitherses, speed this boy on his journey, if he goes atall- which I do not think he will, for he is more likely to stay wherehe is till some one comes and tells him something."

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1.  And Jove answered, "My child, why should you ask me? Was it not byyour own arrangement that Ulysses came home and took his revengeupon the suitors? Do whatever you like, but I will tell you what Ithink will be most reasonable arrangement. Now that Ulysses isrevenged, let them swear to a solemn covenant, in virtue of which heshall continue to rule, while we cause the others to forgive andforget the massacre of their sons and brothers. Let them then allbecome friends as heretofore, and let peace and plenty reign."
2.  So the neighbours and kinsmen of Menelaus were feasting and makingmerry in his house. There was a bard also to sing to them and play hislyre, while two tumblers went about performing in the midst of themwhen the man struck up with his tune.]
3.  BOOK VI.
4、  Then Telemachus said, "Eurymachus, and you other suitors, I shallsay no more, and entreat you no further, for the gods and the peopleof Ithaca now know my story. Give me, then, a ship and a crew oftwenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Spartaand to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.Some one may tell me something, or (and people often hear things inthis way) some heaven-sent message may direct me. If I can hear of himas alive and on his way home I will put up with the waste yousuitors will make for yet another twelve months. If on the otherhand I hear of his death, I will return at once, celebrate his funeralrites with all due pomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make mymother marry again."
5、  BOOK IX.

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  • 金九 08-05

      When he was in this plight, Ino daughter of Cadmus, also calledLeucothea, saw him. She had formerly been a mere mortal, but hadbeen since raised to the rank of a marine goddess. Seeing in whatgreat distress Ulysses now was, she had compassion upon him, and,rising like a sea-gull from the waves, took her seat upon the raft.

  • 沃达斯科 08-05

      "Stockman," answered Ulysses, "you seem to be a very well-disposedperson, and I can see that you are a man of sense. Therefore I willtell you, and will confirm my words with an oath: by Jove, the chiefof all gods, and by that hearth of Ulysses to which I am now come,Ulysses shall return before you leave this place, and if you are sominded you shall see him killing the suitors who are now mastershere."

  • 陈广众 08-05

       "As for myself I kept on puzzling to think how I could best savemy own life and those of my companions; I schemed and schemed, asone who knows that his life depends upon it, for the danger was verygreat. In the end I deemed that this plan would be the best. Themale sheep were well grown, and carried a heavy black fleece, so Ibound them noiselessly in threes together, with some of the withies onwhich the wicked monster used to sleep. There was to be a man underthe middle sheep, and the two on either side were to cover him, sothat there were three sheep to each man. As for myself there was a ramfiner than any of the others, so I caught hold of him by the back,esconced myself in the thick wool under his belly, and flung onpatiently to his fleece, face upwards, keeping a firm hold on it allthe time.

  • 陶天月 08-05

      He then took off his armour and gave it to Eumaeus and Philoetius,who went straight on to the house, while he turned off into thevineyard to make trial of his father. As he went down into the greatorchard, he did not see Dolius, nor any of his sons nor of the otherbondsmen, for they were all gathering thorns to make a fence for thevineyard, at the place where the old man had told them; he thereforefound his father alone, hoeing a vine. He had on a dirty old shirt,patched and very shabby; his legs were bound round with thongs ofoxhide to save him from the brambles, and he also wore sleeves ofleather; he had a goat skin cap on his head, and was looking verywoe-begone. When Ulysses saw him so worn, so old and full of sorrow,he stood still under a tall pear tree and began to weep. He doubtedwhether to embrace him, kiss him, and tell him all about his havingcome home, or whether he should first question him and see what hewould say. In the end he deemed it best to be crafty with him, so inthis mind he went up to his father, who was bending down and diggingabout a plant.

  • 石焌赵 08-04

    {  "When we reached it we went ashore to take in water, and dinedhard by the ships. Immediately after dinner I took a herald and one ofmy men and went straight to the house of Aeolus, where I found himfeasting with his wife and family; so we sat down as suppliants on thethreshold. They were astounded when they saw us and said, 'Ulysses,what brings you here? What god has been ill-treating you? We tookgreat pains to further you on your way home to Ithaca, or whereverit was that you wanted to go to.'

  • 汤晓燕 08-03

      Then Medon said, "I wish, Madam, that this were all; but they areplotting something much more dreadful now- may heaven frustratetheir design. They are going to try and murder Telemachus as he iscoming home from Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to get newsof his father."}

  • 杜莉萍 08-03

      Eurymachus son of Polybus then said, "Go home, old man, and prophesyto your own children, or it may be worse for them. I can read theseomens myself much better than you can; birds are always flying aboutin the sunshine somewhere or other, but they seldom mean anything.Ulysses has died in a far country, and it is a pity you are not deadalong with him, instead of prating here about omens and adding fuel tothe anger of Telemachus which is fierce enough as it is. I suppose youthink he will give you something for your family, but I tell you-and it shall surely be- when an old man like you, who should knowbetter, talks a young one over till he becomes troublesome, in thefirst place his young friend will only fare so much the worse- he willtake nothing by it, for the suitors will prevent this- and in thenext, we will lay a heavier fine, sir, upon yourself than you willat all like paying, for it will bear hardly upon you. As forTelemachus, I warn him in the presence of you all to send his motherback to her father, who will find her a husband and provide her withall the marriage gifts so dear a daughter may expect. Till we shall goon harassing him with our suit; for we fear no man, and care neitherfor him, with all his fine speeches, nor for any fortune-telling ofyours. You may preach as much as you please, but we shall only hateyou the more. We shall go back and continue to eat up Telemachus'sestate without paying him, till such time as his mother leaves offtormenting us by keeping us day after day on the tiptoe ofexpectation, each vying with the other in his suit for a prize of suchrare perfection. Besides we cannot go after the other women whom weshould marry in due course, but for the way in which she treats us."

  • 李松山 08-03

      Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."

  • 蔡邕 08-02

       "My good friend," answered Jove, "I should recommend you at the verymoment when the people from the city are watching the ship on her way,to turn it into a rock near the land and looking like a ship. Thiswill astonish everybody, and you can then bury their city under themountain."

  • 林建荣 07-31

    {  She said this to try him, but Ulysses was very angry and said,"Wife, I am much displeased at what you have just been saying. Who hasbeen taking my bed from the place in which I left it? He must havefound it a hard task, no matter how skilled a workman he was, unlesssome god came and helped him to shift it. There is no man living,however strong and in his prime, who could move it from its place, forit is a marvellous curiosity which I made with my very own hands.There was a young olive growing within the precincts of the house,in full vigour, and about as thick as a bearing-post. I built myroom round this with strong walls of stone and a roof to cover them,and I made the doors strong and well-fitting. Then I cut off the topboughs of the olive tree and left the stump standing. This I dressedroughly from the root upwards and then worked with carpenter's toolswell and skilfully, straightening my work by drawing a line on thewood, and making it into a bed-prop. I then bored a hole down themiddle, and made it the centre-post of my bed, at which I workedtill I had finished it, inlaying it with gold and silver; after this Istretched a hide of crimson leather from one side of it to theother. So you see I know all about it, and I desire to learn whetherit is still there, or whether any one has been removing it bycutting down the olive tree at its roots."

  • 张炎 07-31

      A dark cloud of sorrow fell upon Laertes as he listened. He filledboth hands with the dust from off the ground and poured it over hisgrey head, groaning heavily as he did so. The heart of Ulysses wastouched, and his nostrils quivered as he looked upon his father;then he sprang towards him, flung his arms about him and kissed him,saying, "I am he, father, about whom you are asking- I have returnedafter having been away for twenty years. But cease your sighing andlamentation- we have no time to lose, for I should tell you that Ihave been killing the suitors in my house, to punish them for theirinsolence and crimes."

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