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日期:2020-08-07 06:45:41
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观点

1.   The two girls, therefore, were from an early age not the least daunted by either art or ideal politics. It was their natural atmosphere. They were at once cosmopolitan and provincial, with the cosmopolitan provincialism of art that goes with pure social ideals.
2. A Unique History
3.   "Have you had lunch yet? Of course you haven't. Let's go inhere," and Drouet turned into one of the very nicely furnishedrestaurants off State Street, in Monroe.
4. 18年后,转机忽然出现。
5. 另一方面,也是随着重污染天气特点的发展变化、日常治理措施不断深化进行的必要调整。
6.   'I was shut up in a room where there is a ghost till after dark.'

漫画

1. X
2. BAT的优势一是资金,第二是大量的C端用户,推出一个产品,传播的影响力还是比较大的。
3.   "Bird," replied the princess, who was filled with a joy that seemed strange to herself when she thought that the bird had cost her the lives of both her brothers. "bird, let me first thank you for your good will, and then let me ask you where the Golden Water is to be found."
4.   "Yes, we had best do so."
5. 原标题:湖南一老人拘押期间身亡,曾在看守所内断了14根肋骨徐运柏
6. ▲图片来自中国人大网医生们以救人为志。

推荐功能

1. 当然,如何尽量降低必要的风险,有关部门需要认真筹划,并及时与市民沟通。
2.   Adele went to kiss him before quitting the room: he endured thecaress, but scarcely seemed to relish it more than Pilot would havedone, nor so much.
3.   Afterward, she requested to have some conference with Manutio alone,and every one being gone forth of the Chamber, she spake unto him inthis manner.
4. 在饲料中全面禁止添加抗生素只是提高公共卫生的重要一步,下一步还得规范宠物、农作物(水果、蔬菜和花卉)以及在人的医疗中的抗生素使用,才能全面提升公共卫生水平。
5. 一个组织的好与坏,直接决定了它能承接的机会的能力大小。
6. 到9月底,天猫上就发布了9000万款新品,按20万品牌计,平均每个品牌每月就发布50款新品。

应用

1. 直到7月中考结束,她才住进医院。
2. intimidating
3.   The man was looking at her with those blue, all-seeing eyes of his, which made her turn her face aside a little. He thought her comely, almost beautiful, in her shyness, and he took command of the situation himself at once.
4.   Mistresse shallow-braine, being swolne big with this wind, like anempty bladder; conceived no small pride in hearing these words,constantly crediting them to be true, and therefore thus answered. DidI not tel you Father Albert, that my beauty was celestiall? But Isweare by my beauty, notwithstanding your idle passed arrogancy, Iam heartily sorry for your so severe correction; which that it mayno more be inflicted on you, I do freely pardon you; yet with thisproviso, that you tell me what the God else saide unto you; wheretoFryar Albert thus replyed. Madam, seeing you have so graciouslyvouchsafed to pardon me, I will thankfully tell you all: but youmust be very carefull and respective, that whatsoever I shallreveale unto you, must so closely be concealed, as no livingcreature in the World may know it; for you are the onely happy Ladynow living, and that happinesse relleth on your silence andsecrecie: with solemne vowes and protestations she sealed up hermany promises, and then the Fryar thus proceeded.
5. 本案中,于女士夫妇在未清偿共同债务的情形下,将其共有的房屋无偿赠与小付,且无其他财产用于偿还债务,致使牛先生的债权难以实现,其行为明显给牛先生造成了损害。
6.   4. "Vestra vero, quae dicitur, vita mors est." ("Truly, as is said, your life is a death")

旧版特色

1.   "Of course, you'll do," said Drouet, who, in his efforts toenthuse Carrie, had interested himself. "Do you think I'd comehome here and urge you to do something that I didn't think youwould make a success of? You can act all right. It'll be goodfor you."
2. 报道称,波扎尔吉安称卡拉威的动作为拍打和抓握。
3. 1.轮到你了,查理·布朗

网友评论(32553 / 60014 )

  • 1:舒爽 2020-07-24 06:45:41

    在此基础上,时萃SECRE持续深化订阅+售卖模式。

  • 2:谢春发 2020-07-26 06:45:41

      When the Bishop had heard all the discourse, highly he commended thewisedome of the Gentlewoman, and worthy assistance of her brethren,who contemning to soile their hands in the blood of a Priest, rathersought to shame him as hee deserved. The Bishop enjoyned him apennance of repentance for forty dayes after, but love and disdainemade him weepe nine and forty: Moreover, it was a long while after,before he durst be seene abroad. But when he came to walke thestreets, the Boyes would point their fingers at him, saying. Beholdthe Provoste that lay with Ciutazza: Which was such a wearisome lifeto him, that he became (well neere) distracted in his wits. In thismanner the honest Gentlewoman discharged her dutie, and rid herselfe of the Provosts importunity: Ciutazza had a merry night of it,and a new Smocke also for her labour.

  • 3:叶敬忠 2020-07-20 06:45:41

      When we see any part or organ developed in a remarkable degree or manner in any species, the fair presumption is that it is of high importance to that species; nevertheless the part in this case is eminently liable to variation. Why should this be so? On the view that each species has been independently created, with all its parts as we now see them, I can see no explanation. But on the view that groups of species have descended from other species, and have been modified through natural selection, I think we can obtain some light. In our domestic animals, if any part, or the whole animal, be neglected and no selection be applied, that part (for instance, the comb in the Dorking fowl) or the whole breed will cease to have a nearly uniform character. The breed will then be said to have degenerated. In rudimentary organs, and in those which have been but little specialized for any particular purpose, and perhaps in polymorphic groups, we see a nearly parallel natural case; for in such cases natural selection either has not or cannot come into full play, and thus the organisation is left in a fluctuating condition. But what here more especially concerns us is, that in our domestic animals those points, which at the present time are undergoing rapid change by continued selection, are also eminently liable to variation. Look at the breeds of the pigeon; see what a prodigious amount of difference there is in the beak of the different tumblers, in the beak and wattle of the different carriers, in the carriage and tail of our fantails, &c., these being the points now mainly attended to by English fanciers. Even in the sub-breeds, as in the short-faced tumbler, it is notoriously difficult to breed them nearly to perfection, and frequently individuals are born which depart widely from the standard. There may be truly said to be a constant struggle going on between, on the one hand, the tendency to reversion to a less modified state, as well as an innate tendency to further variability of all kinds, and, on the other hand, the power of steady selection to keep the breed true. In the long run selection gains the day, and we do not expect to fail so far as to breed a bird as coarse as a common tumbler from a good short-faced strain. But as long as selection is rapidly going on, there may always be expected to be much variability in the structure undergoing modification. It further deserves notice that these variable characters, produced by man's selection, sometimes become attached, from causes quite unknown to us, more to one sex than to the other, generally to the male sex, as with the wattle of carriers and the enlarged crop of pouters.Now let us turn to nature. When a part has been developed in an extraordinary manner in any one species, compared with the other species of the same genus, we may conclude that this part has undergone an extraordinary amount of modification, since the period when the species branched off from the common progenitor of the genus. This period will seldom be remote in any extreme degree, as species very rarely endure for more than one geological period. An extraordinary amount of modification implies an unusually large and long-continued amount of variability, which has continually been accumulated by natural selection for the benefit of the species. But as the variability of the extraordinarily-developed part or organ has been so great and long-continued within a period not excessively remote, we might, as a general rule, expect still to find more variability in such parts than in other parts of the organisation, which have remained for a much longer period nearly constant. And this, I am convinced, is the case. That the struggle between natural selection on the one hand, and the tendency to reversion and variability on the other hand, will in the course of time cease; and that the most abnormally developed organs may be made constant, I can see no reason to doubt. Hence when an organ, however abnormal it may be, has been transmitted in approximately the same condition to many modified descendants, as in the case of the wing of the bat, it must have existed, according to my theory, for an immense period in nearly the same state; and thus it comes to be no more variable than any other structure. It is only in those cases in which the modification has been comparatively recent and extraordinarily great that we ought to find the generative variability, as it may be called, still present in a high degree. For in this case the variability will seldom as yet have been fixed by the continued selection of the individuals varying in the required manner and degree, and by the continued rejection of those tending to revert to a former and less modified condition.The principle included in these remarks may be extended. It is notorious that specific characters are more variable than generic. To explain by a simple example what is meant. If some species in a large genus of plants had blue flowers and some had red, the colour would be only a specific character, and no one would be surprised at one of the blue species varying into red, or conversely; but if all the species had blue flowers, the colour would become a generic character, and its variation would be a more unusual circumstance. I have chosen this example because an explanation is not in this case applicable, which most naturalists would advance, namely, that specific characters are more variable than generic, because they are taken from parts of less physiological importance than those commonly used for classing genera. I believe this explanation is partly, yet only indirectly, true; I shall, however, have to return to this subject in our chapter on Classification. It would be almost superfluous to adduce evidence in support of the above statement, that specific characters are more variable than generic; but I have repeatedly noticed in works on natural history, that when an author has remarked with surprise that some important organ or part, which is generally very constant throughout large groups of species, has differed considerably in closely-allied species, that it has, also, been variable in the individuals of some of the species. And this fact shows that a character, which is generally of generic value, when it sinks in value and becomes only of specific value, often becomes variable, though its physiological importance may remain the same. Something of the same kind applies to monstrosities: at least Is. Geoffroy St. Hilaire seems to entertain no doubt, that the more an organ normally differs in the different species of the same group, the more subject it is to individual anomalies.On the ordinary view of each species having been independently created, why should that part of the structure, which differs from the same part in other independently-created species of the same genus, be more variable than those parts which are closely alike in the several species? I do not see that any explanation can be given. But on the view of species being only strongly marked and fixed varieties, we might surely expect to find them still often continuing to vary in those parts of their structure which have varied within a moderately recent period, and which have thus come to differ. Or to state the case in another manner: the points in which all the species of a genus resemble each other, and in which they differ from the species of some other genus, are called generic characters; and these characters in common I attribute to inheritance from a common progenitor, for it can rarely have happened that natural selection will have modified several species, fitted to more or less widely-different habits, in exactly the same manner: and as these so-called generic characters have been inherited from a remote period, since that period when the species first branched off from their common progenitor, and subsequently have not varied or come to differ in any degree, or only in a slight degree, it is not probable that they should vary at the present day. On the other hand, the points in which species differ from other species of the same genus, are called specific characters; and as these specific characters have varied and come to differ within the period of the branching off of the species from a common progenitor, it is probable that they should still often be in some degree variable, at least more variable than those parts of the organisation which have for a very long period remained constant.In connexion with the present subject, I will make only two other remarks. I think it will be admitted, without my entering on details, that secondary sexual characters are very variable; I think it also will be admitted that species of the same group differ from each other more widely in their secondary sexual characters, than in other parts of their organisation; compare, for instance, the amount of difference between the males of gallinaceous birds, in which secondary sexual characters are strongly displayed, with the amount of difference between their females; and the truth of this proposition will be granted. The cause of the original variability of secondary sexual characters is not manifest; but we can see why these characters should not have been rendered as constant and uniform as other parts of the organisation; for secondary sexual characters have been accumulated by sexual selection, which is less rigid in its action than ordinary selection, as it does not entail death, but only gives fewer offspring to the less favoured males. Whatever the cause may be of the variability of secondary sexual characters, as they are highly variable, sexual selection will have had a wide scope for action, and may thus readily have succeeded in giving to the species of the same group a greater amount of difference in their sexual characters, than in other parts of their structure.It is a remarkable fact, that the secondary sexual differences between the two sexes of the same species are generally displayed in the very same parts of the organisation in which the different species of the same genus differ from each other. Of this fact I will give in illustration two instances, the first which happen to stand on my list; and as the differences in these cases are of a very unusual nature, the relation can hardly be accidental. The same number of joints in the tarsi is a character generally common to very large groups of beetles, but in the Engidae, as Westwood has remarked, the number varies greatly; and the number likewise differs in the two sexes of the same species: again in fossorial hymenoptera, the manner of neuration of the wings is a character of the highest importance, because common to large groups; but in certain genera the neuration differs in the different species, and likewise in the two sexes of the same species. This relation has a clear meaning on my view of the subject: I look at all the species of the same genus as having as certainly descended from the same progenitor, as have the two sexes of any one of the species. Consequently, whatever part of the structure of the common progenitor, or of its early descendants, became variable; variations of this part would it is highly probable, be taken advantage of by natural and sexual selection, in order to fit the several species to their several places in the economy of nature, and likewise to fit the two sexes of the same species to each other, or to fit the males and females to different habits of life, or the males to struggle with other males for the possession of the females.Finally, then, I conclude that the greater variability of specific characters, or those which distinguish species from species, than of generic characters, or those which the species possess in common; that the frequent extreme variability of any part which is developed in a species in an extraordinary manner in comparison with the same part in its congeners; and the not great degree of variability in a part, however extraordinarily it may be developed, if it be common to a whole group of species; that the great variability of secondary sexual characters, and the great amount of difference in these same characters between closely allied species; that secondary sexual and ordinary specific differences are generally displayed in the same parts of the organisation, are all principles closely connected together. All being mainly due to the species of the same group having descended from a common progenitor, from whom they have inherited much in common, to parts which have recently and largely varied being more likely still to go on varying than parts which have long been inherited and have not varied, to natural selection having more or less completely, according to the lapse of time, overmastered the tendency to reversion and to further variability, to sexual selection being less rigid than ordinary selection, and to variations in the same parts having been accumulated by natural and sexual selection, and thus adapted for secondary sexual, and for ordinary specific purposes.Distinct species present analogous variations; and a variety of one species often assumes some of the characters of an allied species, or reverts to some of the characters of an early progenitor.

  • 4:本·金斯利 2020-07-20 06:45:41

    415

  • 5:毛戈平 2020-07-21 06:45:41

    困住人们的很多时候不是短板,而是长处。

  • 6:黄征辉 2020-07-20 06:45:41

    "Oh, miss!" breathed Becky. "Thank yer, miss, kindly; it ain't good enough for that. The--the flannin wasn't new."

  • 7:刘强东 2020-08-04 06:45:41

    报告还显示,开发新原材料的创业公司中,大多数或者说60%处于起步阶段,规模增长缓慢。

  • 8:向春玲 2020-07-27 06:45:41

      "Yes, which made fools laugh, which caused the minister tohave a sleepless night, which has caused the minister'ssecretaries to blacken several sheets of paper, but whichhas cost me 700,000 francs."

  • 9:杨厝 2020-08-01 06:45:41

      As the waiter bowed and scraped about, felt the dishes to see ifthey were hot enough, brought spoons and forks, and did all thoselittle attentive things calculated to impress the luxury of thesituation upon the diner, Ames also leaned slightly to one sideand told her of Indianapolis in an intelligent way. He reallyhad a very bright mind, which was finding its chief developmentin electrical knowledge. His sympathies for other forms ofinformation, however, and for types of people, were quick andwarm. The red glow on his head gave it a sandy tinge and put abright glint in his eye. Carrie noticed all these things as heleaned toward her and felt exceedingly young. This man was farahead of her. He seemed wiser than Hurstwood, saner and brighterthan Drouet. He seemed innocent and clean, and she thought thathe was exceedingly pleasant. She noticed, also, that hisinterest in her was a far-off one. She was not in his life, norany of the things that touched his life, and yet now, as he spokeof these things, they appealed to her.

  • 10:哈默菲斯特 2020-07-23 06:45:41

    1、重营销不重产品有网友说:我们提到俏江南,第一反应不是他家有什么好吃的菜品,而是大S、汪小菲和张兰,这就说明了一切!做营销,俏江南是成功的,从耗资3亿的兰会所,再到汪小菲和大S的婚姻,俏江南不断占领着头条,在大众心中有着极大的知名度。

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