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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:韩志斌 大小:EICIAzj423204KB 下载:igz97nja68844次
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日期:2020-08-05 13:05:58
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王成杰

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  BOOK X.
2.  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."
3.  "Stranger," replied Eumaeus, "as regards your question: sit still,make yourself comfortable, drink your wine, and listen to me. Thenights are now at their longest; there is plenty of time both forsleeping and sitting up talking together; you ought not to go to bedtill bed time, too much sleep is as bad as too little; if any one ofthe others wishes to go to bed let him leave us and do so; he can thentake my master's pigs out when he has done breakfast in the morning.We two will sit here eating and drinking in the hut, and telling oneanother stories about our misfortunes; for when a man has sufferedmuch, and been buffeted about in the world, he takes pleasure inrecalling the memory of sorrows that have long gone by. As regardsyour question, then, my tale is as follows:
4.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said; they went tothe store room, which they entered before Melanthius saw them, forhe was busy searching for arms in the innermost part of the room, sothe two took their stand on either side of the door and waited. By andby Melanthius came out with a helmet in one hand, and an olddry-rotted shield in the other, which had been borne by Laertes whenhe was young, but which had been long since thrown aside, and thestraps had become unsewn; on this the two seized him, dragged him backby the hair, and threw him struggling to the ground. They bent hishands and feet well behind his back, and bound them tight with apainful bond as Ulysses had told them; then they fastened a nooseabout his body and strung him up from a high pillar till he wasclose up to the rafters, and over him did you then vaunt, Oswineherd Eumaeus, saying, "Melanthius, you will pass the night on asoft bed as you deserve. You will know very well when morning comesfrom the streams of Oceanus, and it is time for you to be driving inyour goats for the suitors to feast on."
5.  Medon caught these words of Telemachus, for he was crouching under aseat beneath which he had hidden by covering himself up with a freshlyflayed heifer's hide, so he threw off the hide, went up to Telemachus,and laid hold of his knees.
6.  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus and I will hold these suitors incheck, no matter what they do; go back both of you and bindMelanthius' hands and feet behind him. Throw him into the store roomand make the door fast behind you; then fasten a noose about his body,and string him close up to the rafters from a high bearing-post,that he may linger on in an agony."

计划指导

1.  On this Helen told the maid servants to set beds in the room thatwas in the gatehouse, and to make them with good red rugs, andspread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks for the gueststo wear. So the maids went out, carrying a torch, and made the beds,to which a man-servant presently conducted the strangers. Thus,then, did Telemachus and Pisistratus sleep there in the forecourt,while the son of Atreus lay in an inner room with lovely Helen byhis side.
2.  But Pisistratus said, "No matter what hurry we are in we cannotdrive in the dark. It will be morning soon; wait till Menelaus hasbrought his presents and put them in the chariot for us; and let himsay good-bye to us in the usual way. So long as he lives a guestshould never forget a host who has shown him kindness."
3.  As he spoke the sun set and it came on dark, whereon Minerva said,"Sir, all that you have said is well; now, however, order thetongues of the victims to be cut, and mix wine that we may makedrink-offerings to Neptune, and the other immortals, and then go tobed, for it is bed time. People should go away early and not keep latehours at a religious festival."
4.  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.
5.  But Minerva resolved to help Ulysses, so she bound the ways of allthe winds except one, and made them lie quite still; but she rouseda good stiff breeze from the North that should lay the waters tillUlysses reached the land of the Phaeacians where he would be safe.
6.  The words were hardly out of his mouth before his son stood at thedoor. Eumaeus sprang to his feet, and the bowls in which he was mixingwine fell from his hands, as he made towards his master. He kissed hishead and both his beautiful eyes, and wept for joy. A father could notbe more delighted at the return of an only son, the child of his oldage, after ten years' absence in a foreign country and after havinggone through much hardship. He embraced him, kissed him all over asthough he had come back from the dead, and spoke fondly to him saying:

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1.  Thereon he gathered his clouds together, grasped his trident,stirred it round in the sea, and roused the rage of every wind thatblows till earth, sea, and sky were hidden in cloud, and nightsprang forth out of the heavens. Winds from East, South, North, andWest fell upon him all at the same time, and a tremendous sea gotup, so that Ulysses' heart began to fail him. "Alas," he said tohimself in his dismay, "what ever will become of me? I am afraidCalypso was right when she said I should have trouble by sea beforeI got back home. It is all coming true. How black is Jove makingheaven with his clouds, and what a sea the winds are raising fromevery quarter at once. I am now safe to perish. Blest and thrice blestwere those Danaans who fell before Troy in the cause of the sons ofAtreus. Would that had been killed on the day when the Trojans werepressing me so sorely about the dead body of Achilles, for then Ishould have had due burial and the Achaeans would have honoured myname; but now it seems that I shall come to a most pitiable end."
2.  The old woman swore most solemnly that she would not, and when shehad completed her oath, she began drawing off the wine into jars,and getting the barley meal into the bags, while Telemachus wentback to the suitors.
3.  The maids looked at one another and laughed, while pretty Melanthobegan to gibe at him contemptuously. She was daughter to Dolius, buthad been brought up by Penelope, who used to give her toys to playwith, and looked after her when she was a child; but in spite of allthis she showed no consideration for the sorrows of her mistress,and used to misconduct herself with Eurymachus, with whom she was inlove.
4.  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, it is now time for you to tellyour son: do not keep him in the dark any longer, but lay your plansfor the destruction of the suitors, and then make for the town. I willnot be long in joining you, for I too am eager for the fray."
5.   As he spoke he went on board, and bade the others do so also andloose the hawsers, so they took their places in the ship. ButTelemachus bound on his sandals, and took a long and doughty spearwith a head of sharpened bronze from the deck of the ship. Then theyloosed the hawsers, thrust the ship off from land, and made on towardsthe city as they had been told to do, while Telemachus strode on asfast as he could, till he reached the homestead where his countlessherds of swine were feeding, and where dwelt the excellentswineherd, who was so devoted a servant to his master.
6.  BOOK XX.

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1.  "Antinous," answered Telemachus, "I cannot eat in peace, nor takepleasure of any kind with such men as you are. Was it not enoughthat you should waste so much good property of mine while I was yeta boy? Now that I am older and know more about it, I am also stronger,and whether here among this people, or by going to Pylos, I will doyou all the harm I can. I shall go, and my going will not be in vainthough, thanks to you suitors, I have neither ship nor crew of my own,and must be passenger not captain."
2.  And Penelope answered, "Stranger, dreams are very curious andunaccountable things, and they do not by any means invariably cometrue. There are two gates through which these unsubstantial fanciesproceed; the one is of horn, and the other ivory. Those that comethrough the gate of ivory are fatuous, but those from the gate of hornmean something to those that see them. I do not think, however, thatmy own dream came through the gate of horn, though I and my son shouldbe most thankful if it proves to have done so. Furthermore I say-and lay my saying to your heart- the coming dawn will usher in theill-omened day that is to sever me from the house of Ulysses, for I amabout to hold a tournament of axes. My husband used to set up twelveaxes in the court, one in front of the other, like the stays uponwhich a ship is built; he would then go back from them and shoot anarrow through the whole twelve. I shall make the suitors try to do thesame thing, and whichever of them can string the bow most easily,and send his arrow through all the twelve axes, him will I follow, andquit this house of my lawful husband, so goodly and so abounding inwealth. But even so, I doubt not that I shall remember it in mydreams."
3.  "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."
4、  On this the goatherd Melanthius went by back passages to the storeroom of Ulysses, house. There he chose twelve shields, with as manyhelmets and spears, and brought them back as fast as he could togive them to the suitors. Ulysses' heart began to fail him when he sawthe suitors putting on their armour and brandishing their spears. Hesaw the greatness of the danger, and said to Telemachus, "Some oneof the women inside is helping the suitors against us, or it may beMelanthius."
5、  "My dears, heaven has been pleased to try me with more afflictionthan any other woman of my age and country. First I lost my braveand lion-hearted husband, who had every good quality under heaven, andwhose name was great over all Hellas and middle Argos, and now mydarling son is at the mercy of the winds and waves, without myhaving heard one word about his leaving home. You hussies, there wasnot one of you would so much as think of giving me a call out of mybed, though you all of you very well knew when he was starting. If Ihad known he meant taking this voyage, he would have had to give itup, no matter how much he was bent upon it, or leave me a corpsebehind him- one or other. Now, however, go some of you and call oldDolius, who was given me by my father on my marriage, and who is mygardener. Bid him go at once and tell everything to Laertes, who maybe able to hit on some plan for enlisting public sympathy on our side,as against those who are trying to exterminate his own race and thatof Ulysses."

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网友评论(fwGYpcus18081))

  • 韩玮 08-04

      "Here she ended, and dawn enthroned in gold began to show in heaven,whereon she returned inland. I then went on board and told my men toloose the ship from her moorings; so they at once got into her, tooktheir places, and began to smite the grey sea with their oars.Presently the great and cunning goddess Circe befriended us with afair wind that blew dead aft, and stayed steadily with us, keeping oursails well filled, so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear,and let her go as wind and helmsman headed her.

  • 余成群 08-04

      "How sad," exclaimed Telemachus, "that all this was of no avail tosave him, nor yet his own iron courage. But now, sir, be pleased tosend us all to bed, that we may lie down and enjoy the blessed boon ofsleep."

  • 郭承清 08-04

       "Listen to me," replied Ulysses, "and think whether Minerva andher father Jove may seem sufficient, or whether I am to try and findsome one else as well."

  • 孔小雨 08-04

      And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can Iforget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, normore liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live inheaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious withUlysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of theCyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughterto the sea-king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulyssesoutright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home.Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him toreturn; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mindhe can hardly stand out against us."

  • 霍华德-卡特 08-03

    {  "After him I saw huge Orion in a meadow full of asphodel driving theghosts of the wild beasts that he had killed upon the mountains, andhe had a great bronze club in his hand, unbreakable for ever and ever.

  • 王少华 08-02

      "Firstly, then, I will tell you my name that you too may know it,and one day, if I outlive this time of sorrow, may become my thereguests though I live so far away from all of you. I am Ulysses sonof Laertes, reknowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, sothat my fame ascends to heaven. I live in Ithaca, where there is ahigh mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far fromit there is a group of islands very near to one another- Dulichium,Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus. It lies squat on thehorizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while theothers lie away from it towards dawn. It is a rugged island, but itbreeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love tolook upon. The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, andwanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddessCirce; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there isnothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, andhowever splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be farfrom father or mother, he does not care about it. Now, however, I willtell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove's will I metwith on my return from Troy.}

  • 王贤志 08-02

      Laertes' strength failed him when he heard the convincing proofswhich his son had given him. He threw his arms about him, andUlysses had to support him, or he would have gone off into a swoon;but as soon as he came to, and was beginning to recover his senses, hesaid, "O father Jove, then you gods are still in Olympus after all, ifthe suitors have really been punished for their insolence and folly.Nevertheless, I am much afraid that I shall have all the townspeopleof Ithaca up here directly, and they will be sending messengerseverywhere throughout the cities of the Cephallenians."

  • 黄先玫 08-02

      Thus did he speak. Every one approved his saying, and agreed that heshould have his escort inasmuch as he had spoken reasonably. Then whenthey had made their drink-offerings, and had drunk each as much ashe was minded they went home to bed every man in his own abode,leaving Ulysses in the cloister with Arete and Alcinous while theservants were taking the things away after supper. Arete was the firstto speak, for she recognized the shirt, cloak, and good clothes thatUlysses was wearing, as the work of herself and of her maids; so shesaid, "Stranger, before we go any further, there is a question Ishould like to ask you. Who, and whence are you, and who gave youthose clothes? Did you not say you had come here from beyond the sea?"

  • 盖塔尼斯 08-01

       BOOK XXI.

  • 胡永新 07-30

    {  "Sir," said Telemachus, "as regards your question, so long as myfather was here it was well with us and with the house, but the godsin their displeasure have willed it otherwise, and have hidden himaway more closely than mortal man was ever yet hidden. I could haveborne it better even though he were dead, if he had fallen with hismen before Troy, or had died with friends around him when the daysof his fighting were done; for then the Achaeans would have built amound over his ashes, and I should myself have been heir to hisrenown; but now the storm-winds have spirited him away we know notwither; he is gone without leaving so much as a trace behind him,and I inherit nothing but dismay. Nor does the matter end simplywith grief for the loss of my father; heaven has laid sorrows uponme of yet another kind; for the chiefs from all our islands,Dulichium, Same, and the woodland island of Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying their court to my mother, who will neither pointblank say that she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end; sothey are making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so alsowith myself."

  • 洪欣 07-30

      "The first I saw was Tyro. She was daughter of Salmoneus and wife ofCretheus the son of Aeolus. She fell in love with the river Enipeuswho is much the most beautiful river in the whole world. Once when shewas taking a walk by his side as usual, Neptune, disguised as herlover, lay with her at the mouth of the river, and a huge blue wavearched itself like a mountain over them to hide both woman and god,whereon he loosed her virgin girdle and laid her in a deep slumber.When the god had accomplished the deed of love, he took her hand inhis own and said, 'Tyro, rejoice in all good will; the embraces of thegods are not fruitless, and you will have fine twins about this timetwelve months. Take great care of them. I am Neptune, so now gohome, but hold your tongue and do not tell any one.'

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