0 幸运农场幸运农场走势图-APP安装下载

幸运农场幸运农场走势图 注册最新版下载

幸运农场幸运农场走势图 注册

幸运农场幸运农场走势图注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:宋杰 大小:H7dnh9VP69642KB 下载:8GTIN2Rh93606次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:AnXTiwkG74718条
日期:2020-08-06 13:32:01
安卓
徐国英

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Telemachus purposely made Ulysses sit in the part of the cloisterthat was paved with stone; he gave him a shabby-looking seat at alittle table to himself, and had his portion of the inward meatsbrought to him, with his wine in a gold cup. "Sit there," said he,"and drink your wine among the great people. I will put a stop tothe gibes and blows of the suitors, for this is no public house, butbelongs to Ulysses, and has passed from him to me. Therefore, suitors,keep your hands and your tongues to yourselves, or there will bemischief."
2.  Thus did they converse. Then Arete told her maids to set a bed inthe room that was in the gatehouse, and make it with good red rugs,and to spread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks forUlysses to wear. The maids thereon went out with torches in theirhands, and when they had made the bed they came up to Ulysses andsaid, "Rise, sir stranger, and come with us for your bed is ready,"and glad indeed was he to go to his rest.
3.  "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.
4.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."
5.  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."
6.  And Piraeus answered, "Telemachus, you may stay away as long asyou please, but I will look after him for you, and he shall find nolack of hospitality."

计划指导

1.  "Do not find fault child," said Euryclea, "when there is no one tofind fault with. The stranger sat and drank his wine as long as heliked: your mother did ask him if he would take any more bread andhe said he would not. When he wanted to go to bed she told theservants to make one for him, but he said he was re such wretchedoutcast that he would not sleep on a bed and under blankets; heinsisted on having an undressed bullock's hide and some sheepskins putfor him in the cloister and I threw a cloak over him myself."
2.  But Ulysses did not know what to think. "Alas," he said to himselfin his dismay, "this is only some one or other of the gods who isluring me to ruin by advising me to will quit my raft. At any rate Iwill not do so at present, for the land where she said I should bequit of all troubles seemed to be still a good way off. I know whatI will do- I am sure it will be best- no matter what happens I willstick to the raft as long as her timbers hold together, but when thesea breaks her up I will swim for it; I do not see how I can do anybetter than this."
3.  Thus spoke Antinous, but Telemachus heeded him not. Meanwhile theheralds were bringing the holy hecatomb through the city, and theAchaeans gathered under the shady grove of Apollo.
4.  So saying he made a ship's cable fast to one of the bearing-poststhat supported the roof of the domed room, and secured it all aroundthe building, at a good height, lest any of the women's feet shouldtouch the ground; and as thrushes or doves beat against a net that hasbeen set for them in a thicket just as they were getting to theirnest, and a terrible fate awaits them, even so did the women have toput their heads in nooses one after the other and die mostmiserably. Their feet moved convulsively for a while, but not for verylong.
5.  So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."
6.  Telemachus answered boldly, for Minerva had given him courage to askabout his father and get himself a good name.

推荐功能

1.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "The stranger is quitereasonable. He is avoiding the suitors, and is only doing what any oneelse would do. He asks you to wait till sundown, and it will be muchbetter, madam, that you should have him all to yourself, when youcan hear him and talk to him as you will."
2.  Then with both hands he took what Telemachus had sent him, andlaid it on the dirty old wallet at his feet. He went on eating itwhile the bard was singing, and had just finished his dinner as heleft off. The suitors applauded the bard, whereon Minerva went up toUlysses and prompted him to beg pieces of bread from each one of thesuitors, that he might see what kind of people they were, and tell thegood from the bad; but come what might she was not going to save asingle one of them. Ulysses, therefore, went on his round, goingfrom left to right, and stretched out his hands to beg as though hewere a real beggar. Some of them pitied him, and were curious abouthim, asking one another who he was and where he came from; whereon thegoatherd Melanthius said, "Suitors of my noble mistress, I can tellyou something about him, for I have seen him before. The swineherdbrought him here, but I know nothing about the man himself, norwhere he comes from."
3.  "The first ghost 'that came was that of my comrade Elpenor, for hehad not yet been laid beneath the earth. We had left his bodyunwaked and unburied in Circe's house, for we had had too much else todo. I was very sorry for him, and cried when I saw him: 'Elpenor,'said I, 'how did you come down here into this gloom and darkness?You have here on foot quicker than I have with my ship.'
4.  "Bless my heart," replied Menelaus, "then I am receiving a visitfrom the son of a very dear friend, who suffered much hardship formy sake. I had always hoped to entertain him with most markeddistinction when heaven had granted us a safe return from beyond theseas. I should have founded a city for him in Argos, and built him ahouse. I should have made him leave Ithaca with his goods, his son,and all his people, and should have sacked for them some one of theneighbouring cities that are subject to me. We should thus have seenone another continually, and nothing but death could haveinterrupted so close and happy an intercourse. I suppose, however,that heaven grudged us such great good fortune, for it has preventedthe poor fellow from ever getting home at all."
5.   "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."
6.  "Eumaeus, what a noble hound that is over yonder on the manure heap:his build is splendid; is he as fine a fellow as he looks, or is heonly one of those dogs that come begging about a table, and are keptmerely for show?"

应用

1.  She went straight to the beautifully decorated bedroom in whichthere slept a girl who was as lovely as a goddess, Nausicaa,daughter to King Alcinous. Two maid servants were sleeping near her,both very pretty, one on either side of the doorway, which wasclosed with well-made folding doors. Minerva took the form of thefamous sea captain Dymas's daughter, who was a bosom friend ofNausicaa and just her own age; then, coming up to the girl's bedsidelike a breath of wind, she hovered over her head and said:
2.  "My dear child," answered Euryclea, "I am not mocking you. It isquite true as I tell you that Ulysses is come home again. He was thestranger whom they all kept on treating so badly in the cloister.Telemachus knew all the time that he was come back, but kept hisfather's secret that he might have his revenge on all these wickedpeople.
3.  Thus roundly did they rate one another on the smooth pavement infront of the doorway, and when Antinous saw what was going on helaughed heartily and said to the others, "This is the finest sportthat you ever saw; heaven never yet sent anything like it into thishouse. The stranger and Irus have quarreled and are going to fight,let us set them on to do so at once."
4、  Then Ulysses said to Telemachus, "Call nurse Euryclea; I havesomething to say to her."
5、  Here he ended, and the guests sat all of them enthralled andspeechless throughout the covered cloister. Then Arete said to them:

旧版特色

!

网友评论(BjgIY4ZD88803))

  • 弗里泽 08-05

      BOOK II.

  • 叶松亭 08-05

      The rest agreed, and Leiodes son of OEnops was the first to rise. Hewas sacrificial priest to the suitors, and sat in the corner nearthe mixing-bowl. He was the only man who hated their evil deeds andwas indignant with the others. He was now the first to take the bowand arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but hecould not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hardwork, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors,"My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it; this bow shalltake the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it isbetter to die than to live after having missed the prize that wehave so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.Some one of us is even now hoping and praying that he may marryPenelope, but when he has seen this bow and tried it, let him wooand make bridal offerings to some other woman, and let Penelopemarry whoever makes her the best offer and whose lot it is to winher."

  • 胡庆余堂 08-05

       Ulysses frowned on him and said, "My friend, I do you no manner ofharm; people give you a great deal, but I am not jealous. There isroom enough in this doorway for the pair of us, and you need notgrudge me things that are not yours to give. You seem to be justsuch another tramp as myself, but perhaps the gods will give us betterluck by and by. Do not, however, talk too much about fighting or youwill incense me, and old though I am, I shall cover your mouth andchest with blood. I shall have more peace to-morrow if I do, for youwill not come to the house of Ulysses any more."

  • 金雪松 08-05

      The ship bounded forward on her way as a four in hand chariotflies over the course when the horses feel the whip. Her prow curvetedas it were the neck of a stallion, and a great wave of dark blue waterseethed in her wake. She held steadily on her course, and even afalcon, swiftest of all birds, could not have kept pace with her.Thus, then, she cut her way through the water. carrying one who was ascunning as the gods, but who was now sleeping peacefully, forgetful ofall that he had suffered both on the field of battle and by thewaves of the weary sea.

  • 托马斯·巴里 08-04

    {  "Aeolus entertained me for a whole month asking me questions all thetime about Troy, the Argive fleet, and the return of the Achaeans. Itold him exactly how everything had happened, and when I said I mustgo, and asked him to further me on my way, he made no sort ofdifficulty, but set about doing so at once. Moreover, he flayed me aprime ox-hide to hold the ways of the roaring winds, which he shutup in the hide as in a sack- for Jove had made him captain over thewinds, and he could stir or still each one of them according to hisown pleasure. He put the sack in the ship and bound the mouth sotightly with a silver thread that not even a breath of a side-windcould blow from any quarter. The West wind which was fair for us didhe alone let blow as it chose; but it all came to nothing, for we werelost through our own folly.

  • 李启诚 08-03

      "My dear nurse," said Penelope, "however wise you may be you canhardly fathom the counsels of the gods. Nevertheless, we will go insearch of my son, that I may see the corpses of the suitors, and theman who has killed them."}

  • 石富宽 08-03

      But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."

  • 龚建军 08-03

      Then Telemachus went all alone by the sea side, washed his handsin the grey waves, and prayed to Minerva.

  • 陈昕 08-02

       "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."

  • 王淳 07-31

    {  Euryclea did as she was told, and bolted the women inside theirroom. Then Ulysses and his son made all haste to take the helmets,shields, and spears inside; and Minerva went before them with a goldlamp in her hand that shed a soft and brilliant radiance, whereonTelemachus said, "Father, my eyes behold a great marvel: the walls,with the rafters, crossbeams, and the supports on which they restare all aglow as with a flaming fire. Surely there is some god herewho has come down from heaven."

  • 陈羽啸 07-31

      "I agreed to this, so I went back to the sea shore, and found themen at the ship weeping and wailing most piteously. When they saw methe silly blubbering fellows began frisking round me as calves breakout and gambol round their mothers, when they see them coming hometo be milked after they have been feeding all day, and the homesteadresounds with their lowing. They seemed as glad to see me as thoughthey had got back to their own rugged Ithaca, where they had been bornand bred. 'Sir,' said the affectionate creatures, 'we are as glad tosee you back as though we had got safe home to Ithaca; but tell us allabout the fate of our comrades.'

提交评论