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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:丁全录 大小:vGmxb3lU62965KB 下载:StGMyKBz32752次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:GzMQWxjA42326条
日期:2020-08-07 00:37:12
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "I do not know," answered Medon, "whether some god set him on to it,or whether he went on his own impulse to see if he could find out ifhis father was dead, or alive and on his way home."
2.  "She came to me one day when I was by myself, as I often was, forthe men used to go with their barbed hooks, all over the island in thehope of catching a fish or two to save them from the pangs ofhunger. 'Stranger,' said she, 'it seems to me that you like starvingin this way- at any rate it does not greatly trouble you, for youstick here day after day, without even trying to get away thoughyour men are dying by inches.'
3.  "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.
4.  "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we hadbeen killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and saidto the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live ineverlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship:they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the onething I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or downagain. If they do not square accounts with me about my cows, I will godown to Hades and shine there among the dead.'
5.  "May Jove so grant it," replied Telemachus; "if it should prove tobe so, I will make vows to you as though you were a god, even when Iam at home."
6.  On these words the old woman covered her face with her hands; shebegan to weep and made lamentation saying, "My dear child, I cannotthink whatever I am to do with you. I am certain no one was evermore god-fearing than yourself, and yet Jove hates you. No one inthe whole world ever burned him more thigh bones, nor gave him finerhecatombs when you prayed you might come to a green old age yourselfand see your son grow up to take after you; yet see how he hasprevented you alone from ever getting back to your own home. I have nodoubt the women in some foreign palace which Ulysses has got to aregibing at him as all these sluts here have been gibing you. I do notwonder at your not choosing to let them wash you after the manner inwhich they have insulted you; I will wash your feet myself gladlyenough, as Penelope has said that I am to do so; I will wash them bothfor Penelope's sake and for your own, for you have raised the mostlively feelings of compassion in my mind; and let me say thismoreover, which pray attend to; we have had all kinds of strangersin distress come here before now, but I make bold to say that no oneever yet came who was so like Ulysses in figure, voice, and feet asyou are."

计划指导

1.  "Hear me," he cried, "you god who visited me yesterday, and bademe sail the seas in search of my father who has so long beenmissing. I would obey you, but the Achaeans, and more particularly thewicked suitors, are hindering me that I cannot do so."
2.  Then Antinous said, "What god can have sent such a pestilence toplague us during our dinner? Get out, into the open part of the court,or I will give you Egypt and Cyprus over again for your insolenceand importunity; you have begged of all the others, and they havegiven you lavishly, for they have abundance round them, and it is easyto be free with other people's property when there is plenty of it."
3.  "Hush, my dears, for I want to say something. I believe the gods wholive in heaven have sent this man to the Phaeacians. When I firstsaw him I thought him plain, but now his appearance is like that ofthe gods who dwell in heaven. I should like my future husband to bejust such another as he is, if he would only stay here and not want togo away. However, give him something to eat and drink."
4.  Many a plausible tale did Ulysses further tell her, and Penelopewept as she listened, for her heart was melted. As the snow wastesupon the mountain tops when the winds from South East and West havebreathed upon it and thawed it till the rivers run bank full withwater, even so did her cheeks overflow with tears for the husbandwho was all the time sitting by her side. Ulysses felt for her and wasfor her, but he kept his eyes as hard as or iron without lettingthem so much as quiver, so cunningly did he restrain his tears.Then, when she had relieved herself by weeping, she turned to himagain and said: "Now, stranger, I shall put you to the test and seewhether or no you really did entertain my husband and his men, asyou say you did. Tell me, then, how he was dressed, what kind of a manhe was to look at, and so also with his companions."
5.  As she spoke she shed sleep over his eyes, and then went back toOlympus.
6.  "'My dear nurse," said Penelope, "do not exult too confidentlyover all this. You know how delighted every one would be to seeUlysses come home- more particularly myself, and the son who hasbeen born to both of us; but what you tell me cannot be really true.It is some god who is angry with the suitors for their greatwickedness, and has made an end of them; for they respected no manin the whole world, neither rich nor poor, who came near them, whocame near them, and they have come to a bad end in consequence oftheir iniquity. Ulysses is dead far away from the Achaean land; hewill never return home again."

推荐功能

1.  Then he said to Melanthius the goatherd, "Look sharp, light a firein the court, and set a seat hard by with a sheep skin on it; bring usalso a large ball of lard, from what they have in the house. Let uswarm the bow and grease it we will then make trial of it again, andbring the contest to an end."
2.  BOOK XIII.
3.  "Is that so?" exclaimed Minerva, "then you do indeed want Ulysseshome again. Give him his helmet, shield, and a couple lances, and ifhe is the man he was when I first knew him in our house, drinkingand making merry, he would soon lay his hands about these rascallysuitors, were he to stand once more upon his own threshold. He wasthen coming from Ephyra, where he had been to beg poison for hisarrows from Ilus, son of Mermerus. Ilus feared the ever-living godsand would not give him any, but my father let him have some, for hewas very fond of him. If Ulysses is the man he then was thesesuitors will have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.
4.  "Hear me," she cried, "Daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove,unweariable. If ever Ulysses while he was here burned you fat thighbones of sheep or heifer, bear it in mind now as in my favour, andsave my darling son from the villainy of the suitors."
5.   THEN Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broadpavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows. He shed thearrows on to the ground at his feet and said, "The mighty contest isat an end. I will now see whether Apollo will vouchsafe it to me tohit another mark which no man has yet hit."
6.  They were astounded when they heard this, for they had made surethat Telemachus had not gone to the city of Neleus. They thought hewas only away somewhere on the farms, and was with the sheep, orwith the swineherd; so Antinous said, "When did he go? Tell metruly, and what young men did he take with him? Were they freemen orhis own bondsmen- for he might manage that too? Tell me also, didyou let him have the ship of your own free will because he askedyou, or did he take it without yourleave?"

应用

1.  Telemachus purposely made Ulysses sit in the part of the cloisterthat was paved with stone; he gave him a shabby-looking seat at alittle table to himself, and had his portion of the inward meatsbrought to him, with his wine in a gold cup. "Sit there," said he,"and drink your wine among the great people. I will put a stop tothe gibes and blows of the suitors, for this is no public house, butbelongs to Ulysses, and has passed from him to me. Therefore, suitors,keep your hands and your tongues to yourselves, or there will bemischief."
2.  When he had said this, he seated himself beside Alcinous. Supper wasthen served, and the wine was mixed for drinking. A servant led in thefavourite bard Demodocus, and set him in the midst of the company,near one of the bearing-posts supporting the cloister, that he mightlean against it. Then Ulysses cut off a piece of roast pork withplenty of fat (for there was abundance left on the joint) and saidto a servant, "Take this piece of pork over to Demodocus and tellhim to eat it; for all the pain his lays may cause me I will salutehim none the less; bards are honoured and respected throughout theworld, for the muse teaches them their songs and loves them."
3.  "My friends, this man will give us no quarter. He will stand wherehe is and shoot us down till he has killed every man among us. Letus then show fight; draw your swords, and hold up the tables to shieldyou from his arrows. Let us have at him with a rush, to drive him fromthe pavement and doorway: we can then get through into the town, andraise such an alarm as shall soon stay his shooting."
4、  Then Alcinous said, "Stranger, it was very wrong of my daughternot to bring you on at once to my house along with the maids, seeingthat she was the first person whose aid you asked."
5、  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:

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  • 郎木寺 08-06

      "My dear wife," replied Menelaus, "I see the likeness just as youdo. His hands and feet are just like Ulysses'; so is his hair, withthe shape of his head and the expression of his eyes. Moreover, when Iwas talking about Ulysses, and saying how much he had suffered on myaccount, tears fell from his eyes, and he hid his face in his mantle."

  • 姜军 08-06

      "My friend," replied Ulysses, "you are very positive, and veryhard of belief about your master's coming home again, nevertheless Iwill not merely say, but will swear, that he is coming. Do not give meanything for my news till he has actually come, you may then give me ashirt and cloak of good wear if you will. I am in great want, but Iwill not take anything at all till then, for I hate a man, even as Ihate hell fire, who lets his poverty tempt him into lying. I swearby king Jove, by the rites of hospitality, and by that hearth ofUlysses to which I have now come, that all will surely happen as Ihave said it will. Ulysses will return in this self same year; withthe end of this moon and the beginning of the next he will be hereto do vengeance on all those who are ill treating his wife and son."

  • 莱昂纳多迪卡普里奥 08-06

       BOOK XIX.

  • 摩德里奇 08-06

      "He would not answer, but turned away to Erebus and to the otherghosts; nevertheless, I should have made him talk to me in spite ofhis being so angry, or I should have gone talking to him, only thatthere were still others among the dead whom I desired to see.

  • 凌敢高 08-05

    {  On this the day broke, but Ulysses heard the sound of her weeping,and it puzzled him, for it seemed as though she already knew him andwas by his side. Then he gathered up the cloak and the fleeces onwhich he had lain, and set them on a seat in the cloister, but he tookthe bullock's hide out into the open. He lifted up his hands toheaven, and prayed, saying "Father Jove, since you have seen fit tobring me over land and sea to my own home after all the afflictionsyou have laid upon me, give me a sign out of the mouth of some oneor other of those who are now waking within the house, and let me haveanother sign of some kind from outside."

  • 纽曼 08-04

      But Ulysses did not know what to think. "Alas," he said to himselfin his dismay, "this is only some one or other of the gods who isluring me to ruin by advising me to will quit my raft. At any rate Iwill not do so at present, for the land where she said I should bequit of all troubles seemed to be still a good way off. I know whatI will do- I am sure it will be best- no matter what happens I willstick to the raft as long as her timbers hold together, but when thesea breaks her up I will swim for it; I do not see how I can do anybetter than this."}

  • 邹家骅 08-04

      "To this he gave me but a pitiless answer, 'Stranger,' said he, 'youare a fool, or else you know nothing of this country. Talk to me,indeed, about fearing the gods or shunning their anger? We Cyclopes donot care about Jove or any of your blessed gods, for we are ever somuch stronger than they. I shall not spare either yourself or yourcompanions out of any regard for Jove, unless I am in the humour fordoing so. And now tell me where you made your ship fast when youcame on shore. Was it round the point, or is she lying straight offthe land?'

  • 邹雪白 08-04

      "Do not scold me, mother,' answered Telemachus, "nor vex me,seeing what a narrow escape I have had, but wash your face, changeyour dress, go upstairs with your maids, and promise full andsufficient hecatombs to all the gods if Jove will only grant us ourrevenge upon the suitors. I must now go to the place of assembly toinvite a stranger who has come back with me from Pylos. I sent himon with my crew, and told Piraeus to take him home and look afterhim till I could come for him myself."

  • 康诰 08-03

       "Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun wefeasted our fill on meat and drink, but when the sun went down andit came on dark, we camped upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I bade my men on board andloose the hawsers. Then they took their places and smote the greysea with their oars; so we sailed on with sorrow in our hearts, butglad to have escaped death though we had lost our comrades.

  • 黄武 08-01

    {  Thereon he loosed the bonds that bound them, and as soon as theywere free they scampered off, Mars to Thrace and laughter-loving Venusto Cyprus and to Paphos, where is her grove and her altar fragrantwith burnt offerings. Here the Graces hathed her, and anointed herwith oil of ambrosia such as the immortal gods make use of, and theyclothed her in raiment of the most enchanting beauty.

  • 黄百韬 08-01

      "The ship ran before a fresh North wind till we had reached thesea that lies between Crete and Libya; there, however, Jove counselledtheir destruction, for as soon as we were well out from Crete andcould see nothing but sea and sky, he raised a black cloud over ourship and the sea grew dark beneath it. Then Jove let fly with histhunderbolts and the ship went round and round and was filled withfire and brimstone as the lightning struck it. The men fell all intothe sea; they were carried about in the water round the ship lookinglike so many sea-gulls, but the god presently deprived them of allchance of getting home again. I was all dismayed; Jove, however,sent the ship's mast within my reach, which saved my life, for I clungto it, and drifted before the fury of the gale. Nine days did Idrift but in the darkness of the tenth night a great wave bore me onto the Thesprotian coast. There Pheidon king of the Thesprotiansentertained me hospitably without charging me anything at all forhis son found me when I was nearly dead with cold and fatigue, whereonhe raised me by the hand, took me to his father's house and gave meclothes to wear.

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