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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:池莉 大小:0fMeDqgT82888KB 下载:GfhMywY784954次
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日期:2020-08-04 16:48:46
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李国英

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Menelaus said, "All that you have been saying, my dear wife, istrue. I have travelled much, and have had much to do with heroes,but I have never seen such another man as Ulysses. What endurance too,and what courage he displayed within the wooden horse, wherein all thebravest of the Argives were lying in wait to bring death anddestruction upon the Trojans. At that moment you came up to us; somegod who wished well to the Trojans must have set you on to it andyou had Deiphobus with you. Three times did you go all round ourhiding place and pat it; you called our chiefs each by his own name,and mimicked all our wives -Diomed, Ulysses, and I from our seatsinside heard what a noise you made. Diomed and I could not make up ourminds whether to spring out then and there, or to answer you frominside, but Ulysses held us all in check, so we sat quite still, allexcept Anticlus, who was beginning to answer you, when Ulysses clappedhis two brawny hands over his mouth, and kept them there. It wasthis that saved us all, for he muzzled Anticlus till Minerva tookyou away again."
2.  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."
3.  Thus did he pray. Jove heard his prayer and forthwith thundered highup among the from the splendour of Olympus, and Ulysses was gladwhen he heard it. At the same time within the house, a miller-womanfrom hard by in the mill room lifted up her voice and gave him anothersign. There were twelve miller-women whose business it was to grindwheat and barley which are the staff of life. The others had groundtheir task and had gone to take their rest, but this one had not yetfinished, for she was not so strong as they were, and when she heardthe thunder she stopped grinding and gave the sign to her master."Father Jove," said she, "you who rule over heaven and earth, you havethundered from a clear sky without so much as a cloud in it, andthis means something for somebody; grant the prayer, then, of meyour poor servant who calls upon you, and let this be the very lastday that the suitors dine in the house of Ulysses. They have worn meout with the labour of grinding meal for them, and I hope they maynever have another dinner anywhere at all."
4.  "'And I will tell you of all the wicked witchcraft that Circe willtry to practise upon you. She will mix a mess for you to drink, andshe will drug the meal with which she makes it, but she will not beable to charm you, for the virtue of the herb that I shall give youwill prevent her spells from working. I will tell you all about it.When Circe strikes you with her wand, draw your sword and springupon her as though you were goings to kill her. She will then befrightened and will desire you to go to bed with her; on this you mustnot point blank refuse her, for you want her to set your companionsfree, and to take good care also of yourself, but you make her swearsolemnly by all the blessed that she will plot no further mischiefagainst you, or else when she has got you naked she will unman you andmake you fit for nothing.'
5.  "'When your crew have taken you past these Sirens, I cannot give youcoherent directions as to which of two courses you are to take; I willlay the two alternatives before you, and you must consider them foryourself. On the one hand there are some overhanging rocks againstwhich the deep blue waves of Amphitrite beat with terrific fury; theblessed gods call these rocks the Wanderers. Here not even a birdmay pass, no, not even the timid doves that bring ambrosia to FatherJove, but the sheer rock always carries off one of them, and FatherJove has to send another to make up their number; no ship that everyet came to these rocks has got away again, but the waves andwhirlwinds of fire are freighted with wreckage and with the bodiesof dead men. The only vessel that ever sailed and got through, was thefamous Argo on her way from the house of Aetes, and she too would havegone against these great rocks, only that Juno piloted her past themfor the love she bore to Jason.
6.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "If these Achaeans,Madam, would only keep quiet, you would be charmed with the history ofhis adventures. I had him three days and three nights with me in myhut, which was the first place he reached after running away fromhis ship, and he has not yet completed the story of his misfortunes.If he had been the most heaven-taught minstrel in the whole world,on whose lips all hearers hang entranced, I could not have been morecharmed as I sat in my hut and listened to him. He says there is anold friendship between his house and that of Ulysses, and that hecomes from Crete where the descendants of Minos live, after havingbeen driven hither and thither by every kind of misfortune; he alsodeclares that he has heard of Ulysses as being alive and near athand among the Thesprotians, and that he is bringing great wealth homewith him."

计划指导

1.  Thus did he pray, and Minerva heard his prayer, but she would notshow herself to him openly, for she was afraid of her uncle Neptune,who was still furious in his endeavors to prevent Ulysses from gettinghome.
2.  And Piraeus answered, "Telemachus, you may stay away as long asyou please, but I will look after him for you, and he shall find nolack of hospitality."
3.  "After him I saw mighty Hercules, but it was his phantom only, forhe is feasting ever with the immortal gods, and has lovely Hebe towife, who is daughter of Jove and Juno. The ghosts were screaminground him like scared birds flying all whithers. He looked black asnight with his bare bow in his hands and his arrow on the string,glaring around as though ever on the point of taking aim. About hisbreast there was a wondrous golden belt adorned in the most marvellousfashion with bears, wild boars, and lions with gleaming eyes; therewas also war, battle, and death. The man who made that belt, do whathe might, would never be able to make another like it. Hercules knewme at once when he saw me, and spoke piteously, saying, my poorUlysses, noble son of Laertes, are you too leading the same sorry kindof life that I did when I was above ground? I was son of Jove, but Iwent through an infinity of suffering, for I became bondsman to onewho was far beneath me- a low fellow who set me all manner of labours.He once sent me here to fetch the hell-hound- for he did not thinkhe could find anything harder for me than this, but I got the houndout of Hades and brought him to him, for Mercury and Minerva helpedme.'
4.  Now when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Nestor left his couch and took his seat on the benches of white andpolished marble that stood in front of his house. Here aforetime satNeleus, peer of gods in counsel, but he was now dead, and had goneto the house of Hades; so Nestor sat in his seat, sceptre in hand,as guardian of the public weal. His sons as they left their roomsgathered round him, Echephron, Stratius, Perseus, Aretus, andThrasymedes; the sixth son was Pisistratus, and when Telemachus joinedthem they made him sit with them. Nestor then addressed them.
5.  "When we reached it we went ashore to take in water, and dinedhard by the ships. Immediately after dinner I took a herald and one ofmy men and went straight to the house of Aeolus, where I found himfeasting with his wife and family; so we sat down as suppliants on thethreshold. They were astounded when they saw us and said, 'Ulysses,what brings you here? What god has been ill-treating you? We tookgreat pains to further you on your way home to Ithaca, or whereverit was that you wanted to go to.'
6.  "I do not know," answered Medon, "whether some god set him on to it,or whether he went on his own impulse to see if he could find out ifhis father was dead, or alive and on his way home."

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1.  A dark cloud of sorrow fell upon Laertes as he listened. He filledboth hands with the dust from off the ground and poured it over hisgrey head, groaning heavily as he did so. The heart of Ulysses wastouched, and his nostrils quivered as he looked upon his father;then he sprang towards him, flung his arms about him and kissed him,saying, "I am he, father, about whom you are asking- I have returnedafter having been away for twenty years. But cease your sighing andlamentation- we have no time to lose, for I should tell you that Ihave been killing the suitors in my house, to punish them for theirinsolence and crimes."
2.  And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."
3.  "Father," replied Telemachus, "you will come to know me by and by,and when you do you will find that I can keep your counsel. I do notthink, however, the plan you propose will turn out well for eitherof us. Think it over. It will take us a long time to go the round ofthe farms and exploit the men, and all the time the suitors will bewasting your estate with impunity and without compunction. Prove thewomen by all means, to see who are disloyal and who guiltless, but Iam not in favour of going round and trying the men. We can attend tothat later on, if you really have some sign from Jove that he willsupport you."
4.  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.
5.   They were astounded when they heard this, for they had made surethat Telemachus had not gone to the city of Neleus. They thought hewas only away somewhere on the farms, and was with the sheep, orwith the swineherd; so Antinous said, "When did he go? Tell metruly, and what young men did he take with him? Were they freemen orhis own bondsmen- for he might manage that too? Tell me also, didyou let him have the ship of your own free will because he askedyou, or did he take it without yourleave?"
6.  "Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town;I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where Ican tell you that you will meet all the best people among thePhaecians. But be sure and do as I bid you, for you seem to be asensible person. As long as we are going past the fields- and farmlands, follow briskly behind the waggon along with the maids and Iwill lead the way myself. Presently, however, we shall come to thetown, where you will find a high wall running all round it, and a goodharbour on either side with a narrow entrance into the city, and theships will be drawn up by the road side, for every one has a placewhere his own ship can lie. You will see the market place with atemple of Neptune in the middle of it, and paved with large stonesbedded in the earth. Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds,such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars aremade, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they knownothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pridethemselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel farover the sea.

应用

1.  Then Eumaeus said, "You have perceived aright, as indeed yougenerally do; but let us think what will be our best course. Willyou go inside first and join the suitors, leaving me here behindyou, or will you wait here and let me go in first? But do not waitlong, or some one may you loitering about outside, and throw somethingat you. Consider this matter I pray you."
2.  "Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, let Demodocuscease his song, for there are those present who do not seem to likeit. From the moment that we had done supper and Demodocus began tosing, our guest has been all the time groaning and lamenting. He isevidently in great trouble, so let the bard leave off, that we may allenjoy ourselves, hosts and guest alike. This will be much more as itshould be, for all these festivities, with the escort and the presentsthat we are making with so much good will, are wholly in his honour,and any one with even a moderate amount of right feeling knows that heought to treat a guest and a suppliant as though he were his ownbrother.
3.  BOOK XXIII.
4、  Thus said the suitors, but Antinous paid them no heed. MeanwhileTelemachus was furious about the blow that had been given to hisfather, and though no tear fell from him, he shook his head in silenceand brooded on his revenge.
5、  "Good heavens," said he, "see how the gods have saved this manfrom destruction. We kept a succession of scouts upon the headlandsall day long, and when the sun was down we never went on shore tosleep, but waited in the ship all night till morning in the hope ofcapturing and killing him; but some god has conveyed him home in spiteof us. Let us consider how we can make an end of him. He must notescape us; our affair is never likely to come off while is alive,for he is very shrewd, and public feeling is by no means all on ourside. We must make haste before he can call the Achaeans inassembly; he will lose no time in doing so, for he will be furiouswith us, and will tell all the world how we plotted to kill him, butfailed to take him. The people will not like this when they come toknow of it; we must see that they do us no hurt, nor drive us from ourown country into exile. Let us try and lay hold of him either on hisfarm away from the town, or on the road hither. Then we can divideup his property amongst us, and let his mother and the man who marriesher have the house. If this does not please you, and you wishTelemachus to live on and hold his father's property, then we must notgather here and eat up his goods in this way, but must make our offersto Penelope each from his own house, and she can marry the man whowill give the most for her, and whose lot it is to win her."

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网友评论(h3RPlTb748377))

  • 刘睿 08-03

      "My friend," replied Ulysses, "you are very positive, and veryhard of belief about your master's coming home again, nevertheless Iwill not merely say, but will swear, that he is coming. Do not give meanything for my news till he has actually come, you may then give me ashirt and cloak of good wear if you will. I am in great want, but Iwill not take anything at all till then, for I hate a man, even as Ihate hell fire, who lets his poverty tempt him into lying. I swearby king Jove, by the rites of hospitality, and by that hearth ofUlysses to which I have now come, that all will surely happen as Ihave said it will. Ulysses will return in this self same year; withthe end of this moon and the beginning of the next he will be hereto do vengeance on all those who are ill treating his wife and son."

  • 周建杰 08-03

      Penelope then spoke to him. "Antinous," said she, "it is not rightthat you should ill-treat any guest of Telemachus who comes to thishouse. If the stranger should prove strong enough to string the mightybow of Ulysses, can you suppose that he would take me home with himand make me his wife? Even the man himself can have no such idea inhis mind: none of you need let that disturb his feasting; it wouldbe out of all reason."

  • 雷·麦戈文 08-03

       "'Strangers, who are you? Where do sail from? Are you traders, or doyou sail the as rovers, with your hands against every man, and everyman's hand against you?'

  • 耿延强 08-03

      With these words he placed the double cup in the hands ofTelemachus, while Megapenthes brought the beautiful mixing-bowl andset it before him. Hard by stood lovely Helen with the robe ready inher hand.

  • 周霞见 08-02

    {  Then Antinous said, "Queen Penelope, daughter of Icarius, take asmany presents as you please from any one who will give them to you; itis not well to refuse a present; but we will not go about our businessnor stir from where we are, till you have married the best man amongus whoever he may be."

  • 许克振 08-01

      "So I drew back, and sheathed my sword, whereon when he had drank ofthe blood he began with his prophecy.}

  • 袁永华 08-01

      When she had thus made an end of praying, she handed the cup toTelemachus and he prayed likewise. By and by, when the outer meatswere roasted and had been taken off the spits, the carvers gaveevery man his portion and they all made an excellent dinner. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, Nestor, knight of Gerene,began to speak.

  • 托胡提·艾力 08-01

      "Queen Arete," he exclaimed, "daughter of great Rhexenor, in mydistress I humbly pray you, as also your husband and these your guests(whom may heaven prosper with long life and happiness, and may theyleave their possessions to their children, and all the honoursconferred upon them by the state) to help me home to my own country assoon as possible; for I have been long in trouble and away from myfriends."

  • 米切尔·帕克斯 07-31

       On this Antinous began to abuse the swineherd. "You precious idiot,"he cried, "what have you brought this man to town for? Have we nottramps and beggars enough already to pester us as we sit at meat? Doyou think it a small thing that such people gather here to wasteyour master's property and must you needs bring this man as well?"

  • 陈兴根 07-29

    {  They put on their armour as fast as they could- that is to sayUlysses, his three men, and the six sons of Dolius. Laertes also andDolius did the same- warriors by necessity in spite of their greyhair. When they had all put on their armour, they opened the gateand sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way.

  • 吴晓华 07-29

      "They sang these words most musically, and as I longed to hearthem further I made by frowning to my men that they should set mefree; but they quickened their stroke, and Eurylochus and Perimedesbound me with still stronger bonds till we had got out of hearing ofthe Sirens' voices. Then my men took the wax from their ears andunbound me.

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