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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:阮忠 大小:EXzNsKgq77542KB 下载:K21d4kJn37703次
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日期:2020-08-06 21:14:21
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谢松辉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Thus did she speak, and they did even as she had said: twenty ofthem went to the fountain for water, and the others set themselvesbusily to work about the house. The men who were in attendance onthe suitors also came up and began chopping firewood. By and by thewomen returned from the fountain, and the swineherd came after themwith the three best pigs he could pick out. These he let feed aboutthe premises, and then he said good-humouredly to Ulysses,"Stranger, are the suitors treating you any better now, or are they asinsolent as ever?"
2.  To this Ulysses answered, "Amphinomus, you seem to be a man ofgood understanding, as indeed you may well be, seeing whose son youare. I have heard your father well spoken of; he is Nisus ofDulichium, a man both brave and wealthy. They tell me you are his son,and you appear to be a considerable person; listen, therefore, andtake heed to what I am saying. Man is the vainest of all creaturesthat have their being upon earth. As long as heaven vouchsafes himhealth and strength, he thinks that he shall come to no harmhereafter, and even when the blessed gods bring sorrow upon him, hebears it as he needs must, and makes the best of it; for GodAlmighty gives men their daily minds day by day. I know all aboutit, for I was a rich man once, and did much wrong in thestubbornness of my pride, and in the confidence that my father andmy brothers would support me; therefore let a man fear God in allthings always, and take the good that heaven may see fit to send himwithout vainglory. Consider the infamy of what these suitors aredoing; see how they are wasting the estate, and doing dishonour to thewife, of one who is certain to return some day, and that, too, notlong hence. Nay, he will be here soon; may heaven send you homequietly first that you may not meet with him in the day of his coming,for once he is here the suitors and he will not part bloodlessly."
3.  "Maids, servants of Ulysses who has so long been absent, go to thequeen inside the house; sit with her and amuse her, or spin, andpick wool. I will hold the light for all these people. They may staytill morning, but shall not beat me, for I can stand a great deal."
4.  As he spoke he placed the sword in the hands of Ulysses and said,"Good luck to you, father stranger; if anything has been said amissmay the winds blow it away with them, and may heaven grant you asafe return, for I understand you have been long away from home, andhave gone through much hardship."
5.  "Father Jove," he cried, "and all you other blessed gods who livefor ever, come here and see the ridiculous and disgraceful sightthat I will show you. Jove's daughter Venus is always dishonouringme because I am lame. She is in love with Mars, who is handsome andclean built, whereas I am a cripple- but my parents are to blame forthat, not I; they ought never to have begotten me. Come and see thepair together asleep on my bed. It makes me furious to look at them.They are very fond of one another, but I do not think they will liethere longer than they can help, nor do I think that they will sleepmuch; there, however, they shall stay till her father has repaid methe sum I gave him for his baggage of a daughter, who is fair butnot honest."
6.  So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."

计划指导

1.  "The first I saw was Tyro. She was daughter of Salmoneus and wife ofCretheus the son of Aeolus. She fell in love with the river Enipeuswho is much the most beautiful river in the whole world. Once when shewas taking a walk by his side as usual, Neptune, disguised as herlover, lay with her at the mouth of the river, and a huge blue wavearched itself like a mountain over them to hide both woman and god,whereon he loosed her virgin girdle and laid her in a deep slumber.When the god had accomplished the deed of love, he took her hand inhis own and said, 'Tyro, rejoice in all good will; the embraces of thegods are not fruitless, and you will have fine twins about this timetwelve months. Take great care of them. I am Neptune, so now gohome, but hold your tongue and do not tell any one.'
2.  Euryclea did as she was told, and bolted the women inside theirroom. Then Ulysses and his son made all haste to take the helmets,shields, and spears inside; and Minerva went before them with a goldlamp in her hand that shed a soft and brilliant radiance, whereonTelemachus said, "Father, my eyes behold a great marvel: the walls,with the rafters, crossbeams, and the supports on which they restare all aglow as with a flaming fire. Surely there is some god herewho has come down from heaven."
3.  "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."
4.  "Stranger," replied Alcinous, "I am not the kind of man to get angryabout nothing; it is always better to be reasonable; but by FatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, now that I see what kind of person you are,and how much you think as I do, I wish you would stay here, marry mydaughter, and become my son-in-law. If you will stay I will give you ahouse and an estate, but no one (heaven forbid) shall keep you hereagainst your own wish, and that you may be sure of this I willattend to-morrow to the matter of your escort. You can sleep duringthe whole voyage if you like, and the men shall sail you over smoothwaters either to your own home, or wherever you please, even though itbe a long way further off than Euboea, which those of my people whosaw it when they took yellow-haired Rhadamanthus to see Tityus the sonof Gaia, tell me is the furthest of any place- and yet they did thewhole voyage in a single day without distressing themselves, andcame back again afterwards. You will thus see how much my shipsexcel all others, and what magnificent oarsmen my sailors are."
5.  And the ghost of Amphimedon answered, "Agamemnon, son of Atreus,king of men, I remember everything that you have said, and will tellyou fully and accurately about the way in which our end was broughtabout. Ulysses had been long gone, and we were courting his wife,who did not say point blank that she would not marry, nor yet bringmatters to an end, for she meant to compass our destruction: this,then, was the trick she played us. She set up a great tambour frame inher room and began to work on an enormous piece of fine needlework.'Sweethearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeed dead, still, do notpress me to marry again immediately; wait- for I would not have myskill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I have completed a pallfor the hero Laertes, against the time when death shall take him. Heis very rich, and the women of the place will talk if he is laid outwithout a pall.' This is what she said, and we assented; whereuponwe could see her working upon her great web all day long, but at nightshe would unpick the stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us inthis way for three years without our finding it out, but as timewore on and she was now in her fourth year, in the waning of moons andmany days had been accomplished, one of her maids who knew what shewas doing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work,so she had to finish it whether she would or no; and when she showedus the robe she had made, after she had had it washed, its splendourwas as that of the sun or moon.
6.  Then Menelaus said, "All that you have been saying, my dear wife, istrue. I have travelled much, and have had much to do with heroes,but I have never seen such another man as Ulysses. What endurance too,and what courage he displayed within the wooden horse, wherein all thebravest of the Argives were lying in wait to bring death anddestruction upon the Trojans. At that moment you came up to us; somegod who wished well to the Trojans must have set you on to it andyou had Deiphobus with you. Three times did you go all round ourhiding place and pat it; you called our chiefs each by his own name,and mimicked all our wives -Diomed, Ulysses, and I from our seatsinside heard what a noise you made. Diomed and I could not make up ourminds whether to spring out then and there, or to answer you frominside, but Ulysses held us all in check, so we sat quite still, allexcept Anticlus, who was beginning to answer you, when Ulysses clappedhis two brawny hands over his mouth, and kept them there. It wasthis that saved us all, for he muzzled Anticlus till Minerva tookyou away again."

推荐功能

1.  Then Minerva said to Jove, "Father, son of Saturn, king of kings,answer me this question- What do you propose to do? Will you setthem fighting still further, or will you make peace between them?"
2.  "My friend," said Nestor, "now that you remind me, I remember tohave heard that your mother has many suitors, who are ill disposedtowards you and are making havoc of your estate. Do you submit to thistamely, or are public feeling and the voice of heaven against you? Whoknows but what Ulysses may come back after all, and pay thesescoundrels in full, either single-handed or with a force of Achaeansbehind him? If Minerva were to take as great a liking to you as shedid to Ulysses when we were fighting before Troy (for I never yetsaw the gods so openly fond of any one as Minerva then was of yourfather), if she would take as good care of you as she did of him,these wooers would soon some of them him, forget their wooing."
3.  Thus did they converse, and meanwhile the ship which had broughtTelemachus and his crew from Pylos had reached the town of Ithaca.When they had come inside the harbour they drew the ship on to theland; their servants came and took their armour from them, and theyleft all the presents at the house of Clytius. Then they sent aservant to tell Penelope that Telemachus had gone into the country,but had sent the ship to the town to prevent her from being alarmedand made unhappy. This servant and Eumaeus happened to meet whenthey were both on the same errand of going to tell Penelope. When theyreached the House, the servant stood up and said to the queen in thepresence of the waiting women, "Your son, Madam, is now returnedfrom Pylos"; but Eumaeus went close up to Penelope, and said privatelythat her son had given bidden him tell her. When he had given hismessage he left the house with its outbuildings and went back to hispigs again.
4.  "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how theyhad been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savageogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there wasnothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into two companiesand set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while Itook command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, andthe lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his twenty-two men,and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.
5.   As she spoke, she told Eumaeus to set the bow and the pieces of ironbefore the suitors, and Eumaeus wept as he took them to do as shehad bidden him. Hard by, the stockman wept also when he saw hismaster's bow, but Antinous scolded them. "You country louts," said he,"silly simpletons; why should you add to the sorrows of yourmistress by crying in this way? She has enough to grieve her in theloss of her husband; sit still, therefore, and eat your dinners insilence, or go outside if you want to cry, and leave the bow behindyou. We suitors shall have to contend for it with might and main,for we shall find it no light matter to string such a bow as thisis. There is not a man of us all who is such another as Ulysses; for Ihave seen him and remember him, though I was then only a child."
6.  "May it be even so," answered Penelope; "if your words come true youshall have such gifts and such good will from me that all who seeyou shall congratulate you; but I know very well how it will be.Ulysses will not return, neither will you get your escort hence, forso surely as that Ulysses ever was, there are now no longer any suchmasters in the house as he was, to receive honourable strangers orto further them on their way home. And now, you maids, wash his feetfor him, and make him a bed on a couch with rugs and blankets, that hemay be warm and quiet till morning. Then, at day break wash him andanoint him again, that he may sit in the cloister and take his mealswith Telemachus. It shall be the worse for any one of these hatefulpeople who is uncivil to him; like it or not, he shall have no more todo in this house. For how, sir, shall you be able to learn whetheror no I am superior to others of my sex both in goodness of heartand understanding, if I let you dine in my cloisters squalid and illclad? Men live but for a little season; if they are hard, and dealhardly, people wish them ill so long as they are alive, and speakcontemptuously of them when they are dead, but he that is righteousand deals righteously, the people tell of his praise among alllands, and many shall call him blessed."

应用

1.  BOOK IX.
2.  "'We went,' said he, as you told us, through the forest, and inthe middle of it there was a fine house built with cut stones in aplace that could be seen from far. There we found a woman, or else shewas a goddess, working at her loom and singing sweetly; so the menshouted to her and called her, whereon she at once came down, openedthe door, and invited us in. The others did not suspect any mischiefso they followed her into the house, but I stayed where I was, for Ithought there might be some treachery. From that moment I saw themno more, for not one of them ever came out, though I sat a long timewatching for them.'
3.  Telemachus purposely made Ulysses sit in the part of the cloisterthat was paved with stone; he gave him a shabby-looking seat at alittle table to himself, and had his portion of the inward meatsbrought to him, with his wine in a gold cup. "Sit there," said he,"and drink your wine among the great people. I will put a stop tothe gibes and blows of the suitors, for this is no public house, butbelongs to Ulysses, and has passed from him to me. Therefore, suitors,keep your hands and your tongues to yourselves, or there will bemischief."
4、  Ulysses scowled at her and answered, "My good woman, why shouldyou be so angry with me? Is it because I am not clean, and myclothes are all in rags, and because I am obliged to go beggingabout after the manner of tramps and beggars generall? I too was arich man once, and had a fine house of my own; in those days I gave tomany a tramp such as I now am, no matter who he might be nor what hewanted. I had any number of servants, and all the other things whichpeople have who live well and are accounted wealthy, but it pleasedJove to take all away from me; therefore, woman, beware lest you toocome to lose that pride and place in which you now wanton above yourfellows; have a care lest you get out of favour with your mistress,and lest Ulysses should come home, for there is still a chance that hemay do so. Moreover, though he be dead as you think he is, yet byApollo's will he has left a son behind him, Telemachus, who willnote anything done amiss by the maids in the house, for he is now nolonger in his boyhood."
5、  On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan. Earth-encirclingNeptune came, and Mercury the bringer of luck, and King Apollo, butthe goddesses stayed at home all of them for shame. Then the givers ofall good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared withinextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been,whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying:

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  • 汤林华 08-05

      So here Ulysses stood for a while and looked about him, but whenhe had looked long enough he crossed the threshold and went within theprecincts of the house. There he found all the chief people amongthe Phaecians making their drink-offerings to Mercury, which theyalways did the last thing before going away for the night. He wentstraight through the court, still hidden by the cloak of darkness inwhich Minerva had enveloped him, till he reached Arete and KingAlcinous; then he laid his hands upon the knees of the queen, and atthat moment the miraculous darkness fell away from him and he becamevisible. Every one was speechless with surprise at seeing a man there,but Ulysses began at once with his petition.

  • 徐正晓 08-05

      "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."

  • 张建政 08-05

       "I am very much distressed," said Telemachus, "by what you have justtold me. How can I take this stranger into my house? I am as yetyoung, and am not strong enough to hold my own if any man attacksme. My mother cannot make up her mind whether to stay where she is andlook after the house out of respect for public opinion and thememory of her husband, or whether the time is now come for her to takethe best man of those who are wooing her, and the one who will makeher the most advantageous offer; still, as the stranger has come toyour station I will find him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with asword and sandals, and will send him wherever he wants to go. Or ifyou like you can keep him here at the station, and I will send himclothes and food that he may be no burden on you and on your men;but I will not have him go near the suitors, for they are veryinsolent, and are sure to ill-treat him in a way that would greatlygrieve me; no matter how valiant a man may be he can do nothingagainst numbers, for they will be too strong for him."

  • 玉兰亭 08-05

      "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."

  • 孙杨考 08-04

    {  "While we were doing all this, Circe, who knew that we had gotback from the house of Hades, dressed herself and came to us as fastas she could; and her maid servants came with her bringing us bread,meat, and wine. Then she stood in the midst of us and said, 'Youhave done a bold thing in going down alive to the house of Hades,and you will have died twice, to other people's once; now, then,stay here for the rest of the day, feast your fill, and go on withyour voyage at daybreak tomorrow morning. In the meantime I willtell Ulysses about your course, and will explain everything to himso as to prevent your suffering from misadventure either by land orsea.'

  • 骆建华 08-03

      "And what, Telemachus, has led you to take this long sea voyage toLacedaemon? Are you on public or private business? Tell me all aboutit."}

  • 薛思楠 08-03

      "Now," said he, "that our guests have done their dinner, it willbe best to ask them who they are. Who, then, sir strangers, are you,and from what port have you sailed? Are you traders? or do you sailthe seas as rovers with your hand against every man, and every man'shand against you?"

  • 金正恩 08-03

      "I went on board, bidding my men to do so also and loose thehawsers; so they took their places and smote the grey sea with theiroars. When we got to the land, which was not far, there, on the faceof a cliff near the sea, we saw a great cave overhung with laurels. Itwas a station for a great many sheep and goats, and outside therewas a large yard, with a high wall round it made of stones builtinto the ground and of trees both pine and oak. This was the abodeof a huge monster who was then away from home shepherding hisflocks. He would have nothing to do with other people, but led thelife of an outlaw. He was a horrid creature, not like a human being atall, but resembling rather some crag that stands out boldly againstthe sky on the top of a high mountain.

  • 宋佳 08-02

       "Do not," replied Vulcan, "ask me to do this; a bad man's bond isbad security; what remedy could I enforce against you if Mars shouldgo away and leave his debts behind him along with his chains?"

  • 卓泳 07-31

    {  "'Sun,' said Jove, 'go on shining upon us gods and upon mankind overthe fruitful earth. I will shiver their ship into little pieces with abolt of white lightning as soon as they get out to sea.'

  • 张召忠 07-31

      Then the god stayed his stream and stilled the waves, making allcalm before him, and bringing him safely into the mouth of theriver. Here at last Ulysses' knees and strong hands failed him, forthe sea had completely broken him. His body was all swollen, and hismouth and nostrils ran down like a river with sea-water, so that hecould neither breathe nor speak, and lay swooning from sheerexhaustion; presently, when he had got his breath and came tohimself again, he took off the scarf that Ino had given him andthrew it back into the salt stream of the river, whereon Inoreceived it into her hands from the wave that bore it towards her.Then he left the river, laid himself down among the rushes, and kissedthe bounteous earth.

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