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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杨梦鸽 大小:dF0VFc2a70279KB 下载:ZukUmOJF75183次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:NDNtfIRQ58862条
日期:2020-08-04 05:02:04
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周杨宁

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Men of Ithaca, it is all your own fault that things have turned outas they have; you would not listen to me, nor yet to Mentor, when webade you check the folly of your sons who were doing much wrong in thewantonness of their hearts- wasting the substance and dishonouring thewife of a chieftain who they thought would not return. Now, however,let it be as I say, and do as I tell you. Do not go out againstUlysses, or you may find that you have been drawing down evil onyour own heads."
2.  Thus spoke Antinous, but Telemachus heeded him not. Meanwhile theheralds were bringing the holy hecatomb through the city, and theAchaeans gathered under the shady grove of Apollo.
3.  He led the way as he spoke, and Minerva followed him. When they werewithin he took her spear and set it in the spear- stand against astrong bearing-post along with the many other spears of his unhappyfather, and he conducted her to a richly decorated seat under which hethrew a cloth of damask. There was a footstool also for her feet,and he set another seat near her for himself, away from the suitors,that she might not be annoyed while eating by their noise andinsolence, and that he might ask her more freely about his father.
4.  "'Stay here, my brave fellows,' said I, 'all the rest of you,while I go with my ship and exploit these people myself: I want to seeif they are uncivilized savages, or a hospitable and humane race.'
5.  Thus said the suitors, but Antinous paid them no heed. MeanwhileTelemachus was furious about the blow that had been given to hisfather, and though no tear fell from him, he shook his head in silenceand brooded on his revenge.
6.  "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.

计划指导

1.  Here they found the ghost of Achilles son of Peleus, with those ofPatroclus, Antilochus, and Ajax, who was the finest and handsomest manof all the Danaans after the son of Peleus himself.
2.  Telemachus did as his father said, and went off to the store roomwhere the armour was kept. He chose four shields, eight spears, andfour brass helmets with horse-hair plumes. He brought them with allspeed to his father, and armed himself first, while the stockman andthe swineherd also put on their armour, and took their places nearUlysses. Meanwhile Ulysses, as long as his arrows lasted, had beenshooting the suitors one by one, and they fell thick on one another:when his arrows gave out, he set the bow to stand against the end wallof the house by the door post, and hung a shield four hides thickabout his shoulders; on his comely head he set his helmet, wellwrought with a crest of horse-hair that nodded menacingly above it,and he grasped two redoubtable bronze-shod spears.
3.  When Ulysses heard this he put the lid on the chest and made it fastwith a bond that Circe had taught him. He had done so before anupper servant told him to come to the bath and wash himself. He wasvery glad of a warm bath, for he had had no one to wait upon himever since he left the house of Calypso, who as long as he remainedwith her had taken as good care of him as though he had been a god.When the servants had done washing and anointing him with oil, and hadgiven him a clean cloak and shirt, he left the bath room and joinedthe guests who were sitting over their wine. Lovely Nausicaa stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof if the cloister, andadmired him as she saw him pass. "Farewell stranger," said she, "donot forget me when you are safe at home again, for it is to me firstthat you owe a ransom for having saved your life."
4.  "Look to it yourself, father," answered Telemachus, "for they sayyou are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no othermortal man who can compare with you. We will follow you with rightgood will, nor shall you find us fail you in so far as our strengthholds out."
5.  BOOK VIII.
6.  "If Jove were to bring this to pass," replied the stockman, "youshould see how I would do my very utmost to help him."

推荐功能

1.  On these words the old woman covered her face with her hands; shebegan to weep and made lamentation saying, "My dear child, I cannotthink whatever I am to do with you. I am certain no one was evermore god-fearing than yourself, and yet Jove hates you. No one inthe whole world ever burned him more thigh bones, nor gave him finerhecatombs when you prayed you might come to a green old age yourselfand see your son grow up to take after you; yet see how he hasprevented you alone from ever getting back to your own home. I have nodoubt the women in some foreign palace which Ulysses has got to aregibing at him as all these sluts here have been gibing you. I do notwonder at your not choosing to let them wash you after the manner inwhich they have insulted you; I will wash your feet myself gladlyenough, as Penelope has said that I am to do so; I will wash them bothfor Penelope's sake and for your own, for you have raised the mostlively feelings of compassion in my mind; and let me say thismoreover, which pray attend to; we have had all kinds of strangersin distress come here before now, but I make bold to say that no oneever yet came who was so like Ulysses in figure, voice, and feet asyou are."
2.  Thus did he speak. The others all of them applauded his saying,and sent their servants to fetch the presents. Then Euryalus said,"King Alcinous, I will give the stranger all the satisfaction yourequire. He shall have sword, which is of bronze, all but the hilt,which is of silver. I will also give him the scabbard of newly sawnivory into which it fits. It will be worth a great deal to him."
3.  "We do not know, Piraeus," answered Telemachus, "what may happen. Ifthe suitors kill me in my own house and divide my property among them,I would rather you had the presents than that any of those peopleshould get hold of them. If on the other hand I manage to kill them, Ishall be much obliged if you will kindly bring me my presents."
4.  So saying she gave the robe over to him and he received it gladly.Then Pisistratus put the presents into the chariot, and admired themall as he did so. Presently Menelaus took Telemachus and Pisistratusinto the house, and they both of them sat down to table. A maidservant brought them water in a beautiful golden ewer, and poured itinto a silver basin for them to wash their hands, and she drew a cleantable beside them; an upper servant brought them bread and offeredthem many good things of what there was in the house. Eteoneuscarved the meat and gave them each their portions, while Megapenthespoured out the wine. Then they laid their hands upon the good thingsthat were before them, but as soon as they had had had enough to eatand drink Telemachus and Pisistratus yoked the horses, and tooktheir places in the chariot. They drove out through the innergateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court, andMenelaus came after them with a golden goblet of wine in his righthand that they might make a drink-offering before they set out. Hestood in front of the horses and pledged them, saying, "Farewell toboth of you; see that you tell Nestor how I have treated you, for hewas as kind to me as any father could be while we Achaeans werefighting before Troy."
5.   She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then, going upstairs with her handmaids into her room,she mourned her dear husband till Minerva shed sweet sleep over hereyes. But the suitors were clamorous throughout the covered cloisters,and prayed each one that he might be her bed fellow.
6.  "Do not," replied Vulcan, "ask me to do this; a bad man's bond isbad security; what remedy could I enforce against you if Mars shouldgo away and leave his debts behind him along with his chains?"

应用

1.  "The men when they got on shore followed a level road by which thepeople draw their firewood from the mountains into the town, tillpresently they met a young woman who had come outside to fetchwater, and who was daughter to a Laestrygonian named Antiphates. Shewas going to the fountain Artacia from which the people bring in theirwater, and when my men had come close up to her, they asked her whothe king of that country might be, and over what kind of people heruled; so she directed them to her father's house, but when they gotthere they found his wife to be a giantess as huge as a mountain,and they were horrified at the sight of her.
2.  Then Medon said, "I wish, Madam, that this were all; but they areplotting something much more dreadful now- may heaven frustratetheir design. They are going to try and murder Telemachus as he iscoming home from Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to get newsof his father."
3.  "Stranger, I should like to speak with you briefly about anothermatter. It is indeed nearly bed time- for those, at least, who cansleep in spite of sorrow. As for myself, heaven has given me a life ofsuch unmeasurable woe, that even by day when I am attending to myduties and looking after the servants, I am still weeping andlamenting during the whole time; then, when night comes, and we all ofus go to bed, I lie awake thinking, and my heart comes a prey to themost incessant and cruel tortures. As the dun nightingale, daughter ofPandareus, sings in the early spring from her seat in shadiestcovert hid, and with many a plaintive trill pours out the tale howby mishap she killed her own child Itylus, son of king Zethus, even sodoes my mind toss and turn in its uncertainty whether I ought tostay with my son here, and safeguard my substance, my bondsmen, andthe greatness of my house, out of regard to public opinion and thememory of my late husband, or whether it is not now time for me togo with the best of these suitors who are wooing me and making me suchmagnificent presents. As long as my son was still young, and unable tounderstand, he would not hear of my leaving my husband's house, butnow that he is full grown he begs and prays me to do so, beingincensed at the way in which the suitors are eating up his property.Listen, then, to a dream that I have had and interpret it for me ifyou can. I have twenty geese about the house that eat mash out of atrough, and of which I am exceedingly fond. I dreamed that a greateagle came swooping down from a mountain, and dug his curved beak intothe neck of each of them till he had killed them all. Presently hesoared off into the sky, and left them lying dead about the yard;whereon I wept in my room till all my maids gathered round me, sopiteously was I grieving because the eagle had killed my geese. Thenhe came back again, and perching on a projecting rafter spoke to mewith human voice, and told me to leave off crying. 'Be of goodcourage,' he said, 'daughter of Icarius; this is no dream, but avision of good omen that shall surely come to pass. The geese arethe suitors, and I am no longer an eagle, but your own husband, who amcome back to you, and who will bring these suitors to a disgracefulend.' On this I woke, and when I looked out I saw my geese at thetrough eating their mash as usual."
4、  All this he told, but Ulysses was overcome as he heard him, andhis cheeks were wet with tears. He wept as a woman weeps when shethrows herself on the body of her husband who has fallen before hisown city and people, fighting bravely in defence of his home andchildren. She screams aloud and flings her arms about him as he liesgasping for breath and dying, but her enemies beat her from behindabout the back and shoulders, and carry her off into slavery, to alife of labour and sorrow, and the beauty fades from her cheeks-even so piteously did Ulysses weep, but none of those presentperceived his tears except Alcinous, who was sitting near him, andcould hear the sobs and sighs that he was heaving. The king,therefore, at once rose and said:
5、  On this he received Theoclymenus' spear and laid it down on the deckof the ship. He went on board and sat in the stern, biddingTheoclymenus sit beside him; then the men let go the hawsers.Telemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes, and they made allhaste to do so. They set the mast in its socket in the cross plank,raised it and made it fast with the forestays, and they hoistedtheir white sails with sheets of twisted ox hide. Minerva sent thema fair wind that blew fresh and strong to take the ship on hercourse as fast as possible. Thus then they passed by Crouni andChalcis.

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网友评论(dIJeZfNe54229))

  • 韩莉 08-03

      And the vision said, "I shall not tell you for certain whether he isalive or dead, and there is no use in idle conversation."

  • 林依伯 08-03

      Thus did he speak, and they all of them laughed heartily. Eurymachusthen said, "This stranger who has lately come here has lost hissenses. Servants, turn him out into the streets, since he finds itso dark here."

  • 邱朝剑 08-03

       A servant presently led in the famous bard Demodocus, whom themuse had dearly loved, but to whom she had given both good and evil,for though she had endowed him with a divine gift of song, she hadrobbed him of his eyesight. Pontonous set a seat for him among theguests, leaning it up against a bearing-post. He hung the lyre for himon a peg over his head, and showed him where he was to feel for itwith his hands. He also set a fair table with a basket of victualsby his side, and a cup of wine from which he might drink whenever hewas so disposed.

  • 隆鑫 08-03

      Then the old woman took the cauldron in which she was going towash his feet, and poured plenty of cold water into it, adding hottill the bath was warm enough. Ulysses sat by the fire, but ere longhe turned away from the light, for it occurred to him that when theold woman had hold of his leg she would recognize a certain scar whichit bore, whereon the whole truth would come out. And indeed as soon asshe began washing her master, she at once knew the scar as one thathad been given him by a wild boar when he was hunting on MountParnassus with his excellent grandfather Autolycus- who was the mostaccomplished thief and perjurer in the whole world- and with thesons of Autolycus. Mercury himself had endowed him with this gift, forhe used to burn the thigh bones of goats and kids to him, so he tookpleasure in his companionship. It happened once that Autolycus hadgone to Ithaca and had found the child of his daughter just born. Assoon as he had done supper Euryclea set the infant upon his kneesand said, you must find a name for your grandson; you greatly wishedthat you might have one."

  • 周婷余 08-02

    {  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.

  • 王鸿举 08-01

      "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.}

  • 黄蕊 08-01

      "Thus did she speak and we assented. We stayed with Circe for awhole twelvemonth feasting upon an untold quantity both of meat andwine. But when the year had passed in the waning of moons and the longdays had come round, my men called me apart and said, 'Sir, it is timeyou began to think about going home, if so be you are to be sparedto see your house and native country at all.'

  • 蔡文举 08-01

      "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'

  • 胡雪蓉 07-31

       Here they found the ghost of Achilles son of Peleus, with those ofPatroclus, Antilochus, and Ajax, who was the finest and handsomest manof all the Danaans after the son of Peleus himself.

  • 李钟硕 07-29

    {  Penelope heard what he was saying and scolded the maid, "Impudentbaggage, said she, "I see how abominably you are behaving, and youshall smart for it. You knew perfectly well, for I told you myself,that I was going to see the stranger and ask him about my husband, forwhose sake I am in such continual sorrow."

  • 郭玲梅 07-29

      Thus conversing the two made their way towards the house. Whenthey got there they found Telemachus with the stockman and theswineherd cutting up meat and mixing wine with water. Then the oldSicel woman took Laertes inside and washed him and anointed him withoil. She put him on a good cloak, and Minerva came up to him andgave him a more imposing presence, making him taller and stouterthan before. When he came back his son was surprised to see himlooking so like an immortal, and said to him, "My dear father, someone of the gods has been making you much taller and better-looking."

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