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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:彭体 大小:zQPAlirj39829KB 下载:FQfIHQsZ15151次
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日期:2020-08-06 10:01:03
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李明龙

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  At length, she that was in cheefest preheminence among these Women(whom they termed by the name of their Ladie Abbesse) demaunded ofmee, whether I was willing to abide in that condition of life, or toreturne home againe into, Cyprus. I answerd, that I desired nothingmore. But shee, being very carefull of mine honour, would never reposeconfidence in any that came for Cyprus, till two honest Gentlemen ofFrance who hapned thither about two moneths since, accompanied withtheir wives, one of them being a neere kinswoman to the LadyAbbesse. And she well knowing, that they travelled in pilgrimage toJerusalem, to visite the holy Sepulcher, where (as they beleeve)that he whom they held for their God was buried, after the jewes hadput him to death; recommended me to their loving trust, with especiallcharge, for delivering mee to my Father in Cyprus. What honourablelove and respect I found in the company of those Gentlemen and theirWives, during our voyage backe to Cyprus, the historie would beovertedious in reporting, neither is it much materiall to our purpose,because your demaund is to another end.
2.  Oh poore infortunate Lovers, whose Starres were so inauspicious toyou, as to finish both your mortall lives, and fervent love, inlesse limitation then a dayes space. How to censure of your deaths,and happines to ensue thereon, by an accident so strange andinevitable: it is not within the compasse of my power, but to hope thebest, and so I leave you. But yet concerning Simonida her selfe, inthe common opinion of us that remaine living: her true vertue andinnocency (though Fortune was otherwise most cruell to her) wouldnot suffer her to sinke under the testimony of Strambo, Lagina,Atticciato, and Malagevole, being but carders of wool, or perhaps ofmeaner condition; a happier course was ordained for her, to passeclearely from their infamous imputation, and follow her Pasquino, inthe very same manner of death, and with such a speedy expedition.
3.  This strange and uncouth sight, bred in him no meane admiration,as also kinde compassion to the unfortunate woman; out of whichcompassion, sprung an earnest desire, to deliver her (if he could)from a death so full of anguish and horror: but seeing himselfe tobe without Armes, he ran and pluckt up the plant of a Tree, whichhandling as if it had bene a staffe, he opposed himselfe against theDogges and the Knight, who seeing him comming, cryed out in thismanner to him. Anastasio, put not thy selfe in any opposition, butreferre to my Hounds and me, to punish this wicked woman as she hathjustly deserved. And in speaking these words, the Hounds tooke fasthold on her body, so staying her, untill the Knight was come neerer toher, and alighted from his horse: when Anastasio (after some otherangry speeches) spake thus unto him: I cannot tell what or who thouart, albeit thou takest such knowledge of me, yet I must say, thatit is meere cowardize in a Knight, being armed as thou art, to offerto kill a naked woman, and make thy dogges thus to seize on her, as ifshe were a savage beast; therefore beleeve me, I will defend her sofarre as I am able.
4.  IN JUST REPROOFE OF SUCH FOOLISH MEN, AS WILL BE GOVERNED BY
5.  Understand worthy Gentlemen, that Guidotto of Cremona, was mycompanion and deare friend, who growing neere to his death, tolde methat when this City was surprized by the Emperour Frederigo, and allthings committed to sacke and spoile; he and certaine of hisconfederates entred into a House, which they found to bee wellfurnished with goods, but utterly forsaken of the dwellers, onely thispoore Mayden excepted, being then aged but two yeeres, orthereabout. As hee mounted up the steps, with intent to depart fromthe House; she called him Father, which word moved him socompassionately, that he went backe againe, brought her away with him,and all things of worth which were in the House: going thenceafterward to Fano, and there deceasing, hee left her and all his goodsto my charge; conditionally, that I should see her married when duetime required, and bestow on her the wealth which he had left her.Now, very true it is, although her yeeres are convenient for marriage,yet I could never finde any one to bestow her on, at least that Ithought fitting for her: howbeit I will listen thereto much morerespectively, before any other such accident shall happen.
6.  All the while as these words were uttering to her, shee could notdissemble her inward impatience, but starting up as halfe frantickewith fury. she said. O notorious villaine! Darest thou abuse thinehonest wife so basely? I sweare by blessed Saint Bridget, thou shaltbe paid with coyne of thine owne stampe. So casting a light wearingCloake about her, and taking a yong woman in her company; shee wentaway with Nello in no meane haste. Bruno seeing her comming a farreoff, said to Phillippo: You Sir, you know what is to be done, act yourpart according to your appointment. Phillippo went immediately intothe roome, where Calandrino and his other Consorts were at worke,and said to them. Honest friends, I have certaine occasions whichcommand mine instant being at Florence: worke hard while I amabsent, and I will not be unthankefull for it. Away hee departedfrom them, and hid himselfe in a convenient place, where he couldnot be descryed, yet see whatsoever Calandrino did: who when heimagined Phillippo to be farre enough off, descended downe into theCourt, where he found Nicholetta sitting alone, and going towards her,began to enter into discoursing with her.

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1.  In the end of all when I was come home into mine owne house, thisdivellish and accursed woman, being aloft uppon my stayres head, bymuch misfortune chanced to see me; in regard (as it is not unknowne toyou) that women cause all things to lose their vertue. In whichrespect, I that could have stild my selfe the onely happy man inFlorence, am now made most miserable. And therefore did I justly beateher, so long as she was able to stand against mee, and I know noreason to the contrary, why I should not yet teare her in a thousandpeeces: for I may well curse the day of our mariage, to hinder andbereave me of such an invisible blessednesse.
2.  Somewhat early the next morning, the Lady, in care of her sicke Sonshealth, was up and ready betimes, and taking another Gentlewomanwith her; onely as a morning recreation, shee walked to Frederigoespoore Countrey Farme, knowing that it would not a little glad him tosee her. At the time of her arrivall there, he was (by chance) in asilly Garden, on the backe-side of the a si House, because (as yet) itwas no convenient time for flight: but when he heard, that Madam Glanawas come thither, and desired to have some conference with him; as onealmost confounded with admiration, in all hast he ran to her, andsaluted her with most humble reverence. She in all modest and graciousmanner, requited him with the like salutations, thus speaking tohim. Signior Frederigo, your owne best wishes befriend you, I am nowcome hither, to recompence some part of your passed travailes, whichheretofore you pretended traval I to suffer for my sake, when yourlove was more to me, then did well become you to offer, or my selfe toaccept. And such is the nature of my recompence, that I make myselfe your guest, and meane this day to dine with as also thisGentlewoman, making no doubt of our welcome: whereto, with lowlyreverence, thus he replyed.
3.  All the Ladies laughing heartily, at the Novell of theNightingale, so pleasingly delivered by Philostratus, when they sawthe same to be fully ended, the Queene thus spake. Now trust mePhilostratus, though yesterday you did much oppresse mee withmelancholly, yet you have made me such an amends to day, as we havelittle reason to complaine any more of you. So converting her speechto Madam Neiphila, shee commanded her to succeede with herdiscourse, which willingly she yeelded to, beginning in this manner.Seing it pleased Philostratus, to produce his Novell out of Romania: Imeane to walke with him in the same jurisdiction, concerning what I amto say.
4.  Of her in whom I most reposed trust:
5.  SHEWING IN AN EXCELLENT AND LIVELY DEMONSTRATION, THAT ANY
6.  So, proceeding on in his discourse, he recounted every accident asit hapned, both what they had saide and did unto him, concerning theseverall blowes, with the two Flint-stones, the one hurting himgreevously in the heele, and the other paining him as extreamly in thebacke, with their speeches used then, and his laughter,notwithstanding hee felt the harme of them both, yet beeing proud thathe did so invisibly beguile them. Nay more (quoth he) I cannotforbeare to tell you, that when I passed thorow the Port, I saw youstanding with the Warders; yet, by vertue of that excellent Stone,undiscovered of you all. Beside, going along the streets, I met manyof my Gossips, friends, and familiar acquaintance, such as used daylieto converse with me, and drinking together in every Tavern: yet notone of them spake to me, neyther used any courtesie or salutation;which (indeede) I did the more freely forgive them, because theywere not able to see me.

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1.  Which mortall tongue or thought, what ere it be
2.  Very sildome times hee had a sight of his Mother, because sheealwayes kept company with Conradoes wife; and yet when they camewithin view of each other, shee knew not him, nor he her, so muchyeres had altred them both from what they were wont to be, and whenthey saw each other last. Jehannot being thus in the service of MesserConrado, it fortuned that a daughter of his, named Sophia, being thewiddow of one Messer Nicolas Grignam, returned home to her Fathershouse. Very beautifull and amiable she was, young likewise, aged butlittle above sixteene; growing wonderously amorous of Jehannot, and heof her, in extraordinary and most fervent manner: which love was notlong without full effect, continuing many moneths before any personcould perceyve it: which making them to build on the more assurance,they began to carry their meanes with lesse discretion then isrequired in such nice cases, and which cannot be too providentlymanaged.
3.  After many other, as wise and wholesome perswasions, which heconstantly credited, because they spake them, they reconciled him tohis wife, and she to him: but not without some difficulty in him;who falling into wonderfull greefe and melancholy, for losse of suchan admirable precious stone, was in danger to have dyed, withinlesse then a month after.
4.  And for your better information in every particulare; a Beaste,blacke and horned, but of no great stature, will come to fetch you:perhaps he will use some gastly noises, straunge leapes, and loftietrickes, onely to terrifie and affright you: but when he perceiveththat he cannot daunt you, hee will gently come neere you, which whenhe hath done, you may descend from off the Tombe; and, withoutnaming or thinking on God, or any of his Saintes, mount boldly onhis backe, for he will stand ready to receive you. Being so seated,crosse your armes over your brest, without presuming to touch orhandle the Beast, for he will carry you thence softly, and so bringyou along to the company. But if in all this time of your travaile,you call on heaven, any Saint, or bee possessed with the least thoughtof feare: I must plainely tell you, that either hee will cast youdangerously, or throw you into some noysom place. And therefore, ifyou know your selfe, not to be of a constant courage, and sprightlybold, to undertake such an adventure as this: never presume anyfurther, because you may doe us a great deale of injurie, withoutany gaine or benefite to your selfe, but rather such wrong, as wewould be very sorry should happen unto so deere a Friend.
5.   are no better then those of bruite beasts, reason onelydistinguishing this difference, that as they live to perish utterly,so we respire to reigne in eternity. Theame was exceedingly pleasingto the whole Company; who being all risen, by permission of the newKing, every one fel to their wonted recreations, as best agreed withtheir owne disposition; untill the houre for Supper came, wherein theywere served very sumptuously. But being risen from the Table, theybegan their dances, among which, many sweet Sonnets were enterlaced,with such delicate Tunes as moved admiration. Then the Kingcommanded Madam Neiphila, to sing a song in his name, or how her selfestood best affected. And immediatly with a cleare and rare voice, thusshe began.
6.  TRULY NOBLE SOULE, CANNOT BE VIOLENCED OR CONFOUNDED, BY THE

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1.  But above all the rest, Nicoluccio Caccianimico could never besatisfied with beholding her; and, enflamed with earnest desire, toknow what she was, could not refraine (seeing the Knight was goneout of the roome) but demaunded of her, whether she were of Bologna,or a stranger? when the Lady heard her selfe to be thus questioned,and by her Husband, it seemed painefull to her, to containe fromanswering: Neverthelesse, to perfect the Knights intended purpose, shesate silent. Others demaunded of her, whether the sweet Boy were hers,or no; and some questioned, if she were Gentiles Wife, or no, orelse his Kinsewoman; to all which demaunds, she returned not anyanswere. But when the Knight came to them againe, some of them said tohim. Sir, this woman is a goodly creature, but she appeareth to bedumbe, which were great pitty, if it should be so. Gentlemen (quothhe) it is no small argument of her vertue, to sit still and silentat this instant. Tell us then (said they) of whence, and what sheis. Therein (quoth he) I will quickely resolve you, upon yourconditionall promise: that none of you do remove from his place,whatsoever shall be said or done, untill I have fully delivered myminde. Every one bound himselfe by solemne promise, to perform what hehad appointed, and the Tables being voided, as also the Carpetslaid; then the Knight (sitting downe by the Lady) thus began.
2.  "I will prove it so sufficiently," says he, that you shall all bethoroughly convinced. Gentlemen," says he, "by how much a family ismost ancient by so much it is most noble. The family of the Baronchiis the most ancient in Florence, ergo it is the most noble. I havenothing, then, to prove but the antiquity of the Baronchi. This willappear in that Prometheus made them at the time that he first began tolearn to paint, and made others after he was master of his art. Toconvince you of this, do but examine the figures of the one and theother: you'll find art and proportion in the composition of the one,whereas the others are but rough-drawn and imperfect. Among theBaronchi you'll meet with one with a long narrow face, another witha prodigiously broad one; one is flat-nosed, another has a nose thatmeasures an ell; one has a long chin and jaws like an ass, another hashis short and flat, and is monkey-faced. Nay, there are some of themthat have but one eye either larger or lower than the others have.In a word, their faces for all the world resemble such as childrenmake when they first begin to draw. Prometheus, you will allow, mustbe no great master when he made these figures, as I told you before;and consequently they must be more noble as they are more ancient."
3.  Sometime there lived in Sienna two popular men; the one beingnamed Tingoccio Mini, and the other Meucio de Tura; Men simple, and ofno understanding, both of them dwelling in Porta Salaia. These two menlived in such familiar conversation together, and expressed suchcordiall affection each to other, as they seldome walked asunder;but (as honest men use to doe) frequented Churches and Sermons,oftentimes hearing, both what miseries and beatitudes were in theworld to come, according to the merits of their soules that weredeparted out of this life, and found their equall repaiment in theother. The manifold repetition of these matters, made them veryearnestly desirous to know, by what meanes they might have tydingsfrom thence, for their further confirmation. And finding all theirendeavours utterly frustrated, they made a solemne vow and promise(each to other under oath) that hee which first dyed of them two,should returne backe againe (so soone as possibly he could) to theother remaining alive, and tell him such tydings as hee desired toheare.
4、  When they had dined, to their own liking and contentment, they began(in continuation of their former order) to exercise divers dances, andafterward voyces to their instruments, and many pretty Madrigals andRoundelayes. Upon the finishing of these delights, the Queene gavethem leave to take their rest, when such as were so minded, went tosleep, others solaced themselves in the Garden. But after midday wasoverpast, they met (according to their wonted manner) and as theQueene had commanded, at the faire Fountaine; where she being placedin her seate royall, and casting her eye upon Pamphilus, she bad himbegin the dayes discourses, of happy successe in love, afterdisastrous and troublesome accidents; who yeelding thereto with humblereverence, thus began.
5、  Delight not thus in cruelty to dwell.

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  • 王登峰 08-05

      The Lords and all the rest, were wondrously joyfull to heare himso well inclined, expressing no lesse by their shouts and jocundsuffrages: protesting cordially, that she should be welcommed withpompe and majestie, and honoured of them all, as their Liege Ladie andSoveraigne. Afterward, they made preparation for a princely andmagnificent feast, as the Marquesse did the like, for a marriage ofextraordinary state and qualitie, inviting all his kinred, friends,and acquaintance in all parts and Provinces, about him. Hee madealso readie most riche and costly garments, shaped by the body of acomely young Gentlewoman, who he knew to be equall in proportion andstature, to her of whom hee hade made his election.

  • 伊斯科特 08-05

      WHEREIN IS DECLARED, OF WHAT WORTH IT IS TO CONFESSE

  • 钟丽英 08-05

       Then he began to distinguish her parts, commending the tresses ofher haire, which he imagined to be of gold; her forehead, nose, mouth,necke, armes, but (above all) her brests, appearing (as yet) but onelyto shew themselves, like two little mountaines. So that, of afielden clownish lout, he would needs now become a Judge of beauty,coveting earnestly in his soule, to see her eyes, which were veiledover with sound sleepe, that kept them fast enclosed together, andonely to looke on them, hee wished a thousand times, that she wouldawake. For, in his judgement, she excelled all the women that everhe had seene, and doubted, whether she were some Goddesse or no; sostrangely was he metamorphosed from folly, to a sensible apprehension,more then common. And so farre did this sodaine knowledge in himextend; that he could conceive of divine and celestiall things, andthat they were more to be admired and reverenced, then those of humaneor terrene consideration; wherefore the more gladly he contentedhimselfe, to tarry till she awaked of her owne accord. And althoughthe time of stay seemed tedious to him, yet notwithstanding, he wasovercome with such extraordinary contentment, as he had no power todepart thence, but stood as if he had bin glued fast to the ground.

  • 罗琪 08-05

      Thou tookst advantage:

  • 廉湘民 08-04

    {  THE FOURTH DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL

  • 李跃云 08-03

      Wherefore, I hold it much better for me to give it away freely, as Ihave alwayes done my goods and treasure; then bee curious in keepingit, and suffer it to be taken from me (whether I will or no) byNature. A small gift it is, if time make me up the full summe of anhundred yeares: how miserable is it then, to stand beholding but forfoure or five, and all of them vexation too? Take it then I intreatethee, if thou wilt have it; for I never met with any man before (butthy selfe) that di desire it, nor (perhaps) shall finde any other torequest it: for the longer I keepe it, the worse it wil be esteemed:and before it grow contemptible, take it I pray thee.}

  • 畅世博 08-03

      Who is able to expresse ingeniously, the diversity of opinions,which hapned among the Ladies, in censuring on the act of MadameDianora, and which of them was most liberall, eithet SigniorGilberto the Husband, Lord Ansaldo the importunate suiter, or theMagitian, expecting to bee bountifully rewarded. Surely, it is amatter beyond my capacity: but after the King had permitted theirdisputation a long while, looking on Madam Fiammetta, he commandedthat she should report her Novel to make an end of their controversie;and she (without any further delaying) thus began. I did alwaies(Noble Ladies) hold it fit and decent, that in such an assembly asthis of ours is, every one ought to speake so succinctly andplainly: that the obscure understanding, concerning the matters spokenof, should have no cause of disputation. For disputes do much betterbecome the Colledges of Schollers, then to be among us, who hardly canmanage our Distaves or Samplers. And therefore I, who intend to relatesomething, which (peradventure) might appeare doubtfull: will forbeare(seeing you in such a difference; for that which hath bin spokenalreadie) to use any difficult discourse; but will speake of one, aman of no meane ranke or quality, being both a valiant and vertuousKing, and what he did, without any impeach or blemish to his honor.

  • 张洁娴 08-03

      The Lady, who wept exceedingly, thus answered. Alas Sir: I knownot how to carry my selfe, in such extremity of greefe, as now youleave me; but if my life surmount the fortitude of sorrow, andwhatsoever shall happen to you for certainty, either life or death:I will live and dye the Wife of Signiour Thorello, and make myobsequies in his memory onely. so Madame (replyed her Husband) not so;Be not overrash in promising any thing, albeit I am well assured, thatso much as consisteth in thy strength, I make no question of thyperformance. But consider withall (deare heart) thou art a yong woman,beautifull, of great parentage, and no way thereto inferior in theblessings of Fortune.

  • 佘朝礼 08-02

       FROM PERILL

  • 沈辰 07-31

    {  Who this night keepes me companie.

  • 金斗汉 07-31

      When Supper was ended, and the instruments layed before them; by theQueenes consent, Madam Aemilia undertooke the daunce, and the Song wasappointed to Dioneus, who began many, but none that proved to anyliking, they were so palpably obsceene and idle, savouringaltogether of his owne wanton disposition. At the length, the Queenelooking stearnely on him, and commanding him to sing a good one, ornone at all; thus he began.

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